Posts By: Bonnie

Bonnie

Lover of tea. Crazed Bibliophile. Daydreamer.
I have a ridiculous love for the written word. I read anything and everything: Adult fiction, YA, Middle Grade, even the occasional Non-Fiction.

When I'm not reading I'm caring for my step-children, drinking obscene amounts of tea and contemplating what life will be like in the impending apocalypse.

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Book Review – A Study in Scarlet (Sherlock Holmes #1) by Arthur Conan Doyle

October 28, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2011 0 Comments

Book Review – A Study in Scarlet (Sherlock Holmes #1) by Arthur Conan DoyleA Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle
Series: Sherlock Holmes #1
Published by Penguin Classics on October 1st 2001 (first published 1887)
Pages: 192
Genres: Classics, Mystery
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


three-stars

In the debut of literature's most famous sleuth, a dead man is discovered in a bloodstained room in Brixton. The only clues are a wedding ring, a gold watch, a pocket edition of Boccaccio's Decameron, and a word scrawled in blood on the wall. With this investigation begins the partnership of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. Their search for the murderer uncovers a story of love and revenge-and heralds a franchise of detective mysteries starring the formidable Holmes.

Part I: This being the first story in the Sherlock Holmes series, this is also the introduction of the two main characters: Holmes and Watson. After meeting one another they agree to move in together as they were both in need of a roommate. Shortly after, a man is discovered as being murdered and Sherlock Holmes is asked to evaluate the scene to determine if there is any evidence of who may have done it. The only clue is a woman’s wedding ring and the words “RACHE” written in blood on the wall.

Okay so… I think I have a bit of a crush. I loved Sherlock eccentricity and how unconventional he was. I will admit, the mystery wasn’t really much of a mystery but it was still entertaining nonetheless. It did get a big “oooohhhhhhhhh….” from me once the mystery was finally solved though. Silly me, probably should have seen that one coming.

‘There is no mystery about it at all. I am simply applying to ordinary life a few of those precepts of observation and deduction which I advocated in that article. Is there anything else that puzzles you?’

Part II: So, umm… I thought I missed something. The second half of this book was almost like a different book entirely and all of a sudden I’m right smack dab in the middle of Utah and everyone has buckets o’ wives?

Anyways. Essentially, the second half of this book was a major bash-fest on the Mormons. I figure that’s why it ended up on the banned book list.

“We have come,” continued Stangerson, “at the advice of our fathers to solicit the hand of your daughter for whichever of us may seem good to you and to her. As I have but four wives and Brother Drebber here has seven, it appears to me that my claim is the stronger one.”

Uh-huh. Five is definitely better than eight.

Overall, pretty enjoyable, would definitely be interested in reading more about Sherlock most definitely.

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Book Review – The First Days (As the World Dies #1) by Rhiannon Frater

October 28, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2011 0 Comments

Book Review – The First Days (As the World Dies #1) by Rhiannon FraterThe First Days by Rhiannon Frater
Series: As the World Dies #1
Published by Self-Published on August 14th 2008
Pages: 336
Genres: Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic, Zombies
Format: eBook
Source: Purchased
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Fighting to Survive, Siege, The Last Bastion of the Living: A Futuristic Zombie Novel

three-stars

Katie is driving to work one beautiful day when a dead man jumps into her car and tries to eat her. That same morning, Jenni opens a bedroom door to find her husband devouring their toddler son.

Fate puts Jenni and Katie—total strangers—together in a pickup, fleeing the suddenly zombie-filled streets of the Texas city in which they live. Before the sun has set, they have become more than just friends and allies—they are bonded as tightly as any two people who have been to war together.

During their cross-Texas odyssey to find and rescue Jenni’s oldest son, Jenni discovers the joy of watching a zombie’s head explode when she shoots its brains out. Katie learns that she’s a terrific tactician—and a pretty good shot.

A chance encounter puts them on the road to an isolated, fortified town, besieged by zombies, where fewer than one hundred people cling to the shreds of civilization.

It looks like the end of the world. But Katie and Jenni and many others will do whatever they have to to stay alive. Run, fight, pick each other up when they stumble, fall in love…anything is possible at the end of the world.

*Please note I read the older, self-published version. There is a newer, edited version available but my review is not based on that version.*

No one… except for Rhiannon Frater. Her vision of a Zombie Apocalypse was far more gruesome, gory, slightly funny and violently delightful.

The Characters
Katie is an ex-prosecutor (in pre-zombie days) who was married to the love of her life, Lydia. When Katie drove back home to get Lydia, well… Lydia was in the front yard chewing on the mailman. So, Lydia didn’t make it past the first day so Katie flees and seeks shelter somewhere and ends up running into Jenni.

Jenni (with an i, and don’t you forget it) is a stay at home mom who was in an abusive relationship and mighty unhappy with life in general. When she wakes up the morning the zombies first rose, she discovered her husband shoving chunks of her baby’s flesh into his mouth. Not exactly an ideal situation to wake up to first thing in the morning! There’s also a moment involving tiny fingers that will make several appearances throughout the book. I’ll let you discover that for yourself.

Jenni kinda drove me nuts. She was so odd sometimes, being a completely freaked out whiny chick one minute and then laughing maniacally and stabbing zombies in the head the next minute. And ironically, Maja and Wendy both claim that Jenni reminds her of me, minus the craziness. Suuuurrrreeee, guys.

Katie was odd too and I think the writing focused entirely way too much on her ‘lesbianism’, not that I’m against it, it’s just the town and the people had wayyyy too big of an issue with it and it kind of started to wear on me after a point.

Insta-Love and Love Triangles
But of course some insta-love and the occasional love triangle needs to be tossed in, why not? Insta-love pretty much makes my eye all twitchy so when this situation developed I was quite irritated. Not only was their insta-love but a love triangle to boot. I? Was not a happy camper.

So we have Jenni who falls madly in love with Travis (instantly) and OF COURSE Travis loves Katie (instantly). *yawn* Where’s a zombie when ya need one? But once Jenni realizes that Travis loves Katie she (instantly) falls for Juan and they end up hooking up in a janitor’s closet. Hmm… need I say more? I think not.

The Writing
So I didn’t realize this until I was towards the end of the book that this was actually a self-published novel (there is a newer published version that’s super shiny and new for those of you who are interested), which I can see in retrospect. It’s definitely one of the better self-published novels that I’ve read and I did really enjoy it. The action scenes were spot on intense, scary, and extremely ghastly.

Once the book began focusing on the living and everyone was settling down building up walls and doing all kinds of normal stuff… the book went a little downhill for me. The interactions between the characters weren’t all that natural and it came out sounding stiff and unbelievable at times. I began hoping that a zombie would show up and eat someone.

The first half of the book (or so) was a solid 4 stars for me but the second half really lost some steam so I’m settling on a solid 3 star rating. The ending wasn’t exactly a clean wrap-up so I feel like I stopped at the end of the chapter, rather than the end of a book. Will I be continuing the series? Most likely.

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Book Review – The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

October 26, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2011 0 Comments

Book Review – The Great Gatsby by F. Scott FitzgeraldThe Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Published by Scribner on April 10th 1925
Pages: 218
Genres: Classics, Contemporary, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


two-stars

The exemplary novel of the Jazz Age, F. Scott Fitzgeralds' third book, The Great Gatsby (1925), stands as the supreme achievement of his career. T. S. Eliot read it three times and saw it as the "first step" American fiction had taken since Henry James; H. L. Mencken praised "the charm and beauty of the writing," as well as Fitzgerald's sharp social sense; and Thomas Wolfe hailed it as Fitzgerald's "best work" thus far. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when, The New York Times remarked, "gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession," it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s that resonates with the power of myth. A novel of lyrical beauty yet brutal realism, of magic, romance, and mysticism, The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.

This is the definitive, textually accurate edition of The Great Gatsby, edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli and authorized by the estate of F. Scott Fitzgerald. The first edition of The Great Gatsby contained many errors resulting from Fitzgerald's extensive revisions and a rushed production schedule, and subsequent editions introduced further departures from the author's intentions. This critical edition draws on the manuscript and surviving proofs of the novel, along with Fitzgerald's later revisions and corrections, to restore the text to its original form. It is The Great Gatsby as Fitzgerald intended it.

One of the great classics of the 20th century… well, a statement like that will definitely get anyone interested in reading it. Many of you read this in school, but naturally I missed out on this one as well. This one is not only on the BBC Book List but the 1001 books to read before you die.

’For a moment the last sunshine fell with romantic affection upon her glowing face; her voice compelled me forward breathlessly as I listened – then the glow faded, each light deserting her with lingering regret like children leaving a pleasant street at dusk.’

I thoroughly enjoyed the writing of F. Scott Fitzgerald; it was by far the best part of the book. I had a major disconnect with the characters as I found them to be quite shallow and pretentious. The whole story seemed off for me, but I think that was just the overall oddness of the characters themselves. My impression going into this book was that it was to be a great love story… how Gatsby loved Daisy but the war came between them. Daisy, becoming tired of waiting for Gatsby to return, marries Tom who’s a loaf of a man that cheats on her quite openly.

Now I understand this is a book not set in the 20th century and women were supposed to all be stay out home mothers who took care of the house and the children and kept their mouths shut so I naturally didn’t expect her to get fed up with his cheating and hit him over the head with a dinner plate, but I really did expect more. By the end, it all felt a tad anticlimactic and there was a resounding ‘So… what was the point?’ floating through my head.

All in all, I’m glad to have read it so I can now say that I’ve read it, but that it’s definitely not going down as one of my faves.

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Too Many Netgalley’s To Read

October 25, 2011 Bonnie Uncategorized 1 Comment

I always swear I’m never going to let it happen, but once again I’ve let my Netgalley pile get out of control. I blame it on all the good books they post, not that I’m complaining! 🙂


Can’t decide which to read next though… any thoughts/recommendations?
I’m thinking it’s almost time to start reading my Christmas books. 😀

Heart of Evil
Rebirth
Isles of the Forsaken
The Whitefire Crossing
The Windup Girl
Alien Contact
Those Across the River
Ward Against Death
A Line in the Ice
Blood
Sacred Evil
The Evil Inside
The Tigress of Forli: Renaissance Italy's Most Courageous and Notorious Countess, Caterina Riario Sforza de Medici
The Taming of the Rake
Where Demons Fear to Tread
The Sleepwalkers
By Grace Possessed
Knight's Curse
In Total Surrender
1225 Christmas Tree Lane

Share book reviews and ratings with Bonnie, and even join a book club on Goodreads.

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Short and Sweet Review – A Vintage Affair by Isabel Wolff

October 24, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2011 1 Comment

Short and Sweet Review – A Vintage Affair by Isabel WolffA Vintage Affair by Isabel Wolff
on June 17, 2010
Pages: 386
Genres: Contemporary, Historical Fiction, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: The Very Picture of You, Shadows Over Paradise

four-stars

Every dress has a history. And so does every woman.

Phoebe Swift’s friends are stunned when she abruptly leaves a plum job to open her own vintage clothing shop in London—but to Phoebe, it’s the fulfillment of a dream, and her passion. Digging for finds in attics and wardrobes, Phoebe knows that when you buy a piece of vintage clothing, you’re not just buying fabric and thread—you’re buying a piece of someone’s past. But one particular article of clothing will soon unexpectedly change her life.

Thérèse Bell, an elderly Frenchwoman, has an impressive clothing collection. But among the array of elegant suits and couture gowns, Phoebe finds a child’s sky-blue coat—an item with which Mrs. Bell is stubbornly reluctant to part. As the two women become friends, Phoebe will learn the poignant tale of that little blue coat. And she will discover an astonishing connection between herself and Thérèse Bell—one that will help her heal the pain of her own past and allow her to love again.

‘There are some people who say they’re able to ‘compartmentalize’ things, as though it is possible to put negative or distressing thoughts into neat mental drawers to be taken out only at a psychologically convenient time. It’s a beguiling idea, but I’ve never bought it. In my experience, sadness and regret seek into one’s consciousness willy-nilly, or they suddenly leap out at you with a snarl. The only real remedy is time…’

This was an incredible story and not exactly what I was expecting.

The story centers around Phoebe who has just fulfilled her dream of opening her own vintage clothing shop. Her life isn’t completely happy; however, because she’s still trying to deal with the loss of her best friend. She blames her ex-boyfriend for reasons that aren’t explained till the end of the novel.

A side-story involves a French woman who contacts Phoebe to sell some of her vintage clothes. Phoebe visits her and while browsing through all of her beautiful clothes she discovers a seemingly out of place children’s blue jacket. The woman decides to share her story involving life during WWII for the first time in her life with Phoebe. The two are able to help each other by sharing their stories and being able to move on with their lives.

It was truly a beautiful story.

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Book Review – Wither (The Chemical Garden #1) by Lauren DeStefano

October 24, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA 0 Comments

Book Review – Wither (The Chemical Garden #1) by Lauren DeStefanoWither by Lauren DeStefano
Series: The Chemical Garden #1
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on March 22, 2011
Pages: 384
Genres: Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Perfect Ruin, Burning Kingdoms, The Peculiar Night of the Blue Heart

one-half-stars

What if you knew exactly when you would die?

Thanks to modern science, every human being has become a ticking genetic time bomb—males only live to age twenty-five, and females only live to age twenty. In this bleak landscape, young girls are kidnapped and forced into polygamous marriages to keep the population from dying out.

When sixteen-year-old Rhine Ellery is taken by the Gatherers to become a bride, she enters a world of wealth and privilege. Despite her husband Linden’s genuine love for her, and a tenuous trust among her sister wives, Rhine has one purpose: to escape—to find her twin brother and go home.

But Rhine has more to contend with than losing her freedom. Linden’s eccentric father is bent on finding an antidote to the genetic virus that is getting closer to taking his son, even if it means collecting corpses in order to test his experiments. With the help of Gabriel, a servant she trusts, Rhine attempts to break free, in the limted time she has left.

I had major issues with the dystopian situation this book found itself in. The virus and evolution of everything seemed too far-fetched for me. The more YA books I read, the more I’m finding that there are books out there labeled as YA that young adults should not be reading because of the topics… this book being one of them.

Spoilers ahead..

Girls hide inside their houses at night scared of being kidnapped by ‘Guardians’ and sold into prostitution or sold as child brides to men who can afford them. The opening scene was a group of girls that had been kidnapped, three were ‘approved’, the rest were shot. The approved child brides are taken to the mansion of their future husband where they are promptly married to 21-year old Linden. One of the brides is only 13 years old. Sure this happens and sure this is real; however, there are some topics that just shouldn’t be glamorized and geared towards young adults.

I didn’t think it would be possible, yet I did manage to finish it. I can understand the story, I understand that these kind of things do happen in this world… but it was one of the worst books I’ve ever read.

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Book Review – City of Fallen Angels (The Mortal Instruments #4) by Cassandra Clare

October 24, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA 0 Comments

Book Review – City of Fallen Angels (The Mortal Instruments #4) by Cassandra ClareCity of Fallen Angels by Cassandra Clare
Series: The Mortal Instruments #4
Published by Margaret K. McElderry Books on April 5th 2011
Pages: 448
Genres: Fantasy, Paranormal
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Clockwork Princess

one-star

The Mortal War is over, and sixteen-year-old Clary Fray is back home in New York, excited about all the possibilities before her. She's training to become a Shadowhunter and to use her unique power. Her mother is getting married to the love of her life. Downworlders and Shadowhunters are at peace at last. And - most importantly of all - she can finally call Jace her boyfriend.

But nothing comes without a price.

Someone is murdering Shadowhunters who used to be in Valentine's Circle, provoking tensions between Downworlders and Shadowhunters that could lead to a second bloody war. Clary's best friend, Simon, can't help her. His mother just found out that he's a vampire and now he's homeless. Everywhere he turns, someone wants him on their side - along with the power of the curse that's wrecking his life. And they're willing to do anything to get what they want. At the same time he's dating two beautiful, dangerous girls - neither of whom knows about the other one.

When Jace begins to pull away from Clary without explaining why, she is forced to delve into the heart of a mystery whose solution reveals her worst nightmare: She herself has set in motion a terrible chain of events that could lead to her losing everything she loves. Even Jace.

Love. Blood. Betrayal. Revenge. The stakes are higher than ever in City of Fallen Angels.

As happy as I was that the Mortal Instruments series was continuing… I would’ve preferred that it hadn’t. Because this book? Was painful. I am usually able to finish books quickly but this one drug on and on and on to the point where I just wanted to give up. Some spoilers ahead.

I had a hard time from the very beginning understanding exactly what was going on. There wasn’t a clear plot and even if the author was attempting to be vague and have it be a surprise or whatnot, she failed miserably. The basis of the book solely revolved around Jace and Clary’s relationship problems, but even those weren’t clear. And it was beyond irritating that Jace was clearly having issues and yet he refused to talk to Clary about it. And him continuing to say ‘I love you but I can’t be with you, but lets kiss and make out but… now I can’t look at you. Get away from me.’ That repeated about 5 times kinda made me want to rip his face off.

And then the ending?! Come on. Yeah, we’re going to leave Jace up on the roof alone with the kind of not so dead guy but everything’s going to be fine because obviously things went perfect the FIRST time they killed him. Stupid. It was like a bad horror movie where the dumb blonde decides to go down to see what the chainsaw-like noise is in the dark basement even though the light won’t turn on and she can’t be bothered to find a flashlight.

I loved the first three of the Mortal Instruments but was seriously disappointed in this one. The series would’ve been better off left as it was in the third book.

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Book Review – Anna Dressed in Blood (Anna #1) by Kendare Blake

October 24, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA 2 Comments

Book Review – Anna Dressed in Blood (Anna #1) by Kendare BlakeAnna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake
Series: Anna #1
Published by Tor Teen on August 30, 2011
Pages: 320
Genres: Ghosties, Horror
Format: Hardcover
Source: a Giveaway
Amazon
Goodreads

Cas Lowood has inherited an unusual vocation: He kills the dead.

So did his father before him, until he was gruesomely murdered by a ghost he sought to kill. Now, armed with his father's mysterious and deadly athame, Cas travels the country with his kitchen-witch mother and their spirit-sniffing cat. Together they follow legends and local lore, trying to keep up with the murderous dead—keeping pesky things like the future and friends at bay.

When they arrive in a new town in search of a ghost the locals call Anna Dressed in Blood, Cas doesn't expect anything outside of the ordinary: track, hunt, kill. What he finds instead is a girl entangled in curses and rage, a ghost like he's never faced before. She still wears the dress she wore on the day of her brutal murder in 1958: once white, now stained red and dripping with blood. Since her death, Anna has killed any and every person who has dared to step into the deserted Victorian she used to call home.

But she, for whatever reason, spares Cas's life.

‘Anna is a murderer. Yet Anna is not evil. Anna kills, but Anna doesn’t want to kill.’

Anna was murdered and a curse was placed upon her that kept her forever locked inside the house where she died and she can’t stop herself from attacking and killing anyone who enters.

Cas is a ghost killer. He travels the country based on news and tips received about ghosts who are doing harm to humans… he only goes after the most dangerous ones. The second he hears about Anna he knows he’ll be going after her next.

‘Anna Dressed in Blood’ quickly became initiated into my Favorites shelf. This was one fabulously exciting novel that turned me into a wild page turning crazy person. I was initially intrigued by the cover but had thoughts that it would turn out to be cheesy and not worth my time… boy was I wrong. This was one extremely well written book. The storyline was original and I loved it. I’m a total sucker for ghostie books or anything undead in general so I knew I had to give this a shot either way.

CREEPY. Man! I would not have expected this, I suppose because it’s a YA book but wowsa… there were a few times I thought my eyeballs were gonna fall out of my head my eyes were open so far. Creepy, gruesome, but I LOVED IT. No fluffy bunny stuff here, beware.

There have been a lot of comparisons between ‘Anna Dressed in Blood’ and ‘Necromancer’ and while I’m in complete agreement because of the sense of humor, but there is a subtle difference between the main characters. In ‘Anna’ Cas is fully aware of his powers at the start of the novel and what he is able to do and he has a confidence that is admirable and quite lacking in ‘Necromancer’. Overall, all of the characters were well written and extremely likeable and I enjoyed every minute of this.

Holy crap. That? Was some awesome shit.

I’m so excited for the next installment Girl of Nightmares… I’ll be getting my hands on this ASAP. I would HIGHLY recommend this book.

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Book Review – The Witches by Roald Dahl

October 24, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Middle Grade, Read in 2011 1 Comment

Book Review – The Witches by Roald DahlThe Witches by Roald Dahl
Published by Scholastic Press on August 16, 2007 (first published 1983)
Pages: 208
Genres: Classics, Fantasy, Horror
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: The Gremlins

three-stars

This Roald Dahl classic tells the scary, funny and imaginative tale of a seven-year-old boy who has a run-in with some real-life witches! "In fairy tales witches always wear silly black hats and black cloaks and they ride on broomsticks. But this is not a fairy tale. This is about REAL WITCHES. REAL WITCHES dress in ordinary clothes and look very much like ordinary women. They live in ordinary houses and they work in ordinary jobs. That is why they are so hard to catch." Witches, as our hero learns, hate children. With the help of a friend and his somewhat-magical grandmother, our hero tries to expose the witches before they dispose of him.

“In fairy tales, witches always wear silly black hats and black cloaks, and they ride on broomsticks. But this is not a fairy-tale. This is about REAL WITCHES.”

I decided to read this in support of Banned Book Week. So obviously I’m a bit behind schedule as this is my first time reading this and I know many of you had read this early on in your childhood. I’m 25 years old and am just now getting around to experiencing it. I positively adored Roald Dahl’s writing and am quite surprised that I never actually read a single one of his books.

“The curtains were never drawn in that house, and through the windows I could see huge snowflakes falling slowly on to an outside world that was as black as tar.”

Does it make me a total wuss to admit that this book really freaked me out a few times? And what about those pictures?! Holy crap.

That? Is some seriously scary shit right there.

Bottom Line… it was quite a charming little book and the relationship between the little boy and his grandmother was damn adorable.

“It doesn’t matter who you are or what you look like so long as somebody loves you.”

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Book Review – The Iron Daughter (Iron Fey #2) by Julie Kagawa

October 24, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA 0 Comments

Book Review – The Iron Daughter (Iron Fey #2) by Julie KagawaThe Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa
Series: The Iron Fey #2
Published by Harlequin Teen on August 1st 2010
Pages: 361
Genres: Fantasy, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: The Iron King, Winter's Passage, The Iron Knight

two-stars

Half Summer faery princess, half human, Meghan has never fit in anywhere. Deserted by the Winter prince she thought loved her, she is prisoner to the Winter faery queen. As war looms between Summer and Winter, Meghan knows that the real danger comes from the Iron fey - ironbound faeries that only she and her absent prince have seen. But no one believes her.

Worse, Meghan's own fey powers have been cut off. She's stuck in Faery with only her wits for help. Trusting anyone would be foolish. Trusting a seeming traitor could be deadly. But even as she grows a backbone of iron, Meghan can't help but hear the whispers of longing in her all-too-human heart.

I really feel like I’m missing something with this series. I started reading it based solely off the declarations of love and whatnot and I’ve since become sorely disappointed.

The Storyline
In The Iron Daughter, Meghan has become the prisoner of Queen Mab the Winter Faery Queen. After Meghan witnesses the death of Queen Mab’s son by the hands of the Iron Fey she once again gets entangled in that drama. Meghan and a few friends set off in search of the Iron Fey where all kinds of predictable fun is in store for them.

The ‘Romance’
Is there some manual out there for aspiring YA writers? Is there a requirement listed that in order for a YA book to be successful there must be a love triangle? I don’t know who started it (My hunch? It’s all Twilight’s fault) but the idea that love triangles are fun, exciting, and makes a book all sorts of romantical is so so wrong. But I’m not picking sides! I’m going to go a complete different route.

Team Grimalkin! One bad ass kitty cat. Even though he is kind of a shit.

Bottom Line
I feel so entwined in this series that I feel I must continue, but I can’t promise I won’t complain the entire time. Meghan’s character is the WHINIEST person I have ever had the unfortunate opportunity to read about. I understand she’s like 17 or something but COME ON. Between the constant whining and crying about Ash, and the whining and crying about Puck, and not having powers, and wanting to go back to high school, wanting to go home, some more whining about Ash… it really got old. I feel no connection with this main character and honestly? Somebody really needs to slap some sense into that girl. The ending was somewhat redeemable though… what with Meghan turning into kind-of a badass. I did say kind-of. I can only hope for more in the next book.

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