Publisher: Little Brown Books for Young Readers

Waiting on Wednesday – The King of Crows (The Diviners #4) by Libba Bray

May 1, 2019 Bonnie Waiting on Wednesday 3 Comments

Waiting on Wednesday – The King of Crows (The Diviners #4) by Libba BrayThe King of Crows by Libba Bray
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on February 4, 2020
Pages: 336
Genres: Historical Fiction, Occult & Supernatural
Format: Hardcover
Amazon | Book Depository
Goodreads

Also by this author: Beauty Queens

The breath-taking finale to the epic New York Times bestseller, The Diviners, from Printz winner and beloved author, Libba Bray.

After the horrifying explosion that claimed one of their own, the Diviners find themselves wanted by the US government, and on the brink of war with the King of Crows.

While Memphis and Isaiah run for their lives from the mysterious Shadow Men, Isaiah receives a startling vision of a girl, Sarah Beth Olson, who could shift the balance in their struggle for peace. Sarah Beth says she knows how to stop the King of Crows-but, she will need the Diviners' help to do it.

Elsewhere, Jericho has returned after his escape from Jake Marlowe's estate, where he has learned the shocking truth behind the King of Crow's plans. Now, the Diviners must travel to Bountiful, Nebraska, in hopes of joining forces with Sarah Beth and to stop the King of Crows and his army of the dead forever.

But as rumors of towns becoming ghost towns and the dead developing unprecedented powers begin to surface, all hope seems to be lost.

In this sweeping finale, The Diviners will be forced to confront their greatest fears and learn to rely on one another if they hope to save the nation, and world from catastrophe...

About Libba Bray

Libba Bray is the New York Times bestselling author of The Gemma Doyle trilogy (A Great and Terrible BeautyRebel AngelsThe Sweet Far Thing); the Michael L. Printz Award-winning Going BovineBeauty Queens, an L.A. Times Book Prize finalist; and The Diviners series. She is originally from Texas but makes her home in Brooklyn, NY, with her husband, son, and two sociopathic cats.

The series finale! Well, at least now I know how long I have to (finally) get around to reading Before the Devil Breaks You! February 2020 seems ages away but it really isn’t. Fingers crossed that January LaVoy for the audiobook narration.

What are you waiting on this Wednesday?

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National Book Award 2015 Finalist – The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin

November 12, 2015 Bonnie Book Reviews, Middle Grade, Read in 2015 2 Comments

National Book Award 2015 Finalist – The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali BenjaminThe Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on September 22nd 2015
Pages: 352
Genres: Realistic YA Fiction
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
Goodreads

four-stars

This stunning debut novel about grief and wonder was an instant New York Times bestseller and captured widespread critical acclaim, including selection as a 2015 National Book Award finalist!

After her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting-things don't just happen for no reason. Retreating into a silent world of imagination, she crafts a plan to prove her theory--even if it means traveling the globe, alone. Suzy's achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death, the astonishing wonder of the universe...and the potential for love and hope right next door.

‘The thing is, a person gets so few chances to really fix something, to make it right. When one of those opportunities comes along, you can’t overthink it. You’ve got to grab hold of it and cling to it with all your might, no matter how cray cray it might seem.’

When Suzy’s mom sits her down to tell her that her former best friend Franny has died in a drowning accident, the only reason she gives her is that “sometimes things just happen”. Former best friend or not, Suzy fails to accept this simplistic verdict. The duo had been friends since they were five, but Franny found a new group of girls to hang out with when they went into Middle School leaving Suzy all by herself. So in addition to basically losing Franny a second time, Suzy is struggling to come to terms with her parent’s divorce as well. Deciding that her words are of little consequence, she decides one day to no longer speak. During a school field trip, she watches a jellyfish float through its watery cage, and it suddenly comes to her that she knows exactly how Franny died.

“That’s what science is,” she explained. “It’s learning what others have discovered about the world, and then – when you bump up against a question that no one has ever answered before – figuring out how to get the answer you need.

The Thing About Jellyfish bounces back and forth in time, slowly unfolding the story on how Franny
became the former best-friend. It’s a melancholy tale and you can’t help feeling for the poor girl. She’s never stopped caring for Franny though, and once she’s gone, Suzy feels that after some time has passed she’s the only one that still seems to care about her or even consider her death to be mysterious. This quickly leads her into a scientific research adventure into jellyfish from around the world, and most especially the Irukandji jellyfish. Through Suzy’s research, we learn that the sting of an Irukandji can cause muscle cramps which could essentially lead to drowning. At only a few centimeters long and almost completely transparent, Suzy believes it’s up to her to prove that Franny’s death wasn’t something that just happened.

‘There’s no single right way to say goodbye to someone you love. But the most important thing is that you keep some part of them inside you.’

The Thing About Jellyfish is a poignant story about coming to terms with your grief while the world around you continues like nothing has changed. The protagonist may only be twelve-years-old, however, her sentimental experience is something that will be easily understood and acknowledged by readers of all ages.

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Early Review – The Dead House by Dawn Kurtagich

September 12, 2015 Bonnie Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2015, YA 0 Comments

I received this book free from The Novl in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – The Dead House by Dawn KurtagichThe Dead House by Dawn Kurtagich
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on September 15th 2015
Pages: 432
Genres: Horror, Mental Illness, Mystery
Format: ARC
Source: The Novl
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
Goodreads

three-stars

The Dead House is a chilling psychological horror that will keep you guessing even after the final page, from debut author Dawn Kurtagich.

Welcome to the Dead House.

Three students: dead.

Carly Johnson: vanished without a trace.

Two decades have passed since an inferno swept through Elmbridge High, claiming the lives of three teenagers and causing one student, Carly Johnson, to disappear. The main suspect: Kaitlyn, "the girl of nowhere."

Kaitlyn's diary, discovered in the ruins of Elmbridge High, reveals the thoughts of a disturbed mind. Its charred pages tell a sinister version of events that took place that tragic night, and the girl of nowhere is caught in the center of it all. But many claim Kaitlyn doesn't exist, and in a way, she doesn't - because she is the alter ego of Carly Johnson.

Carly gets the day. Kaitlyn has the night. It's during the night that a mystery surrounding the Dead House unravels and a dark, twisted magic ruins the lives of each student that dares touch it.

Debut author Dawn Kurtagich masterfully weaves together a thrilling and terrifying story using psychiatric reports, witness testimonials, video footage, and the discovered diary - and as the mystery grows, the horrifying truth about what happened that night unfolds.


‘Some people say that night blooms. But night descends self-consciously. Night cuts slowly.’

Is it possible for two souls to inhabit a single body? By day, Carly is in control but as soon as the sun sets Kaitlyn takes over. Every day, the same pattern. The two are aware of the other’s existence, calling one another sister, writing notes back and forth to each other. When they lose their parents in a car accident and they are committed to a mental hospital after being diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder, Kaitlyn doesn’t handle this very well. The counselor sees her as the “wrong” identity, the one that needs to be dealt with and gotten rid of. Kaitlyn begins hearing voices, seeing a frightening girl that she’s not sure is real or simply a figment of her imagination, and nightmares of a house of terror. Kaitlyn has to deduct exactly what is fact and what is fiction in order to find out the truth about Carly and of herself.

Flash forward to two decades later and we learn that a tragic fire took place at Carly’s school killing several students with Carly herself being declared missing. Not until Kaitlyn’s diary is uncovered do we learn of what really caused the fire and what took place that disastrous day. It uncovers much more than a simple psychological mystery; there is dark magic and murder and horror. The story unfolds through a series of e-mails, medical transcripts, diary entries, and notes between the duo. Epistolary stories are a favorite of mine, giving me the feel that I’m sorting through documents attempting to uncover the mystery and solve the investigation and The Dead House definitely gave me that feel. The writing was terrific and while it didn’t necessarily scare (few stories do these days though) several passages did leave my skin crawling.

‘I am lucky to be here. The Dead House descended like music curdling into time, and as it did I grew wet and cold, and it was dark and I was so alone… It had devoured me.’

While I loved the feel of this novel I did feel it bit off more than it could chew adding a few too many side stories that weren’t ultimately necessary to the already tangled mystery and the strangeness of the dark magic inclusion that never felt fully fleshed out. The romance(s) were equally trivial putting a melodramatic spin on things that definitely could have been omitted to maintain clarity and focus on the real story. What really brought this one down for me was the ending. I’m all for endings of ambiguity that leave me to make up my own mind about how things turned out, but this one ends like you ran into a dead end. There were just far too many unresolved questions and too few answers for my liking, but if you like concocting your own ending then this is the book for you. I still very much enjoyed the premise and the execution and look forward to reading more from this debut author.

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Book Review – Blood of My Blood (Jasper Dent #3) by Barry Lyga

July 11, 2015 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2015, YA 2 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review – Blood of My Blood (Jasper Dent #3) by Barry LygaBlood of My Blood by Barry Lyga
Series: Jasper Dent #3
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on September 9th 2014
Pages: 480
Genres: Horror, Mystery
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
Goodreads

Also by this author: I Hunt Killers, Game

four-stars

The game is over in this heart-pounding finale to the I Hunt Killers trilogy

Jazz Dent has been shot and left to die in New York City. His girlfriend Connie is in the clutches of Jazz's serial killer father, Billy. And his best friend Howie is bleeding to death on the floor of Jazz's own home in tiny Lobo's Nod. Somehow, these three must rise above the horrors their lives have become and find a way to come together in pursuit of Billy. But then Jazz crosses a line he's never crossed before, and soon the entire country is wondering: "Like father, like son?" Who is the true monster?

The chase is on, and beyond Billy there lurks something much, much worse. Prepare to meet...the Crow King.

Jasper Dent series

I Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga {Review}
Game (Jasper Dent #2) by Barry Lyga {Review}

‘What’s it like to go looking for your soul, only to learn you never had one to begin with?’

Blood of My Blood is the epic conclusion to the story of Jasper Dent. Picking up from the cliffhangers of Game, Connie has stumbled into the clutches of Billy Dent himself, Howie is in the hospital, and Jasper is grasping at straws trying to figure out how he’s going to save his mother after being shot. Jasper has also fought with knowing who his father is and knowing that his blood runs through his veins. He becomes resigned to the fact that he’s the only one that’s going to be able to truly stop his father and the realization that he must become him to do just that is distressing to watch unfold.

Wow. Talk about sick and twisted revelations. We’ve known from the beginning that Jasper’s a tad bit twisted, but that’s to be expected being the son of a serial killer. But Lyga reeeeaaalllly took the ferocity and perverseness to the next level. While I’ve heard that a lot of people saw the twist coming, I was pleased that the big shocker managed to evade me and when the big reveal happened… whoa.

I read this installment immediately after Game which definitely helped seeing as there is very little to no recapping. In comparison to Game, which took me over 2 weeks to finish, Blood is infinitely more thrilling and I practically swallowed this story whole in under 24 hours. My main issue with most trilogy/series reads is when conclusions lack any sort of final gratification. I’m happy to say that Lyga’s end to Jazz’s story is fulfilling but matches the tone of the whole trilogy without treading into “happily ever after” territory.

Blood of My Blood is a very fast paced wallop of a story and is a most satisfying end to this dark trilogy.

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Book Review – Odin’s Ravens (The Blackwell Pages #2) by K.L. Armstrong & M.A. Marr

June 7, 2014 Bonnie Book Reviews, Middle Grade, Read in 2014 2 Comments

Book Review – Odin’s Ravens (The Blackwell Pages #2) by K.L. Armstrong & M.A. MarrOdin's Ravens by K.L. Armstrong, M.A. Marr
Series: The Blackwell Pages #2
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on May 13th 2014
Pages: 352
Genres: Fantasy, Norse Mythology
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Loki's Wolves

three-half-stars

Seven kids, Thor's hammer, and a whole lot of Valkyries are the only things standing against the end of the world.

When thirteen-year-old Matt Thorsen, a modern day descendant of the Norse god Thor, was chosen to represent Thor in an epic battle to prevent the apocalypse he thought he knew how things would play out. Gather the descendants standing in for gods like Loki and Odin, defeat a giant serpent, and save the world. No problem, right?

But the descendants' journey grinds to a halt when their friend and descendant Baldwin is poisoned and killed and Matt, Fen, and Laurie must travel to the Underworld in the hopes of saving him. But that's only their first stop on their journey to reunite the challengers, find Thor's hammer, and stop the apocalypse--a journey filled with enough tooth-and-nail battles and larger-than-life monsters to make Matt a legend in his own right.

Authors K.L. Armstrong and M.A. Marr return to Blackwell in the epic sequel to Loki's Wolveswith more explosive action, adventure and larger-than-life Norse legends.

The Blackwell Pages

11438693

Loki’s Wolves (The Blackwell Pages #1) by K.L. Armstrong & M.A. Marr {PurchaseMy Review}

​’…they were about to ride into battle with Valkyries, Berserkers, and… goats. It was pretty epic.’​​

Odin’s Ravens, the next installment following Loki’s Wolves, picks up right where the last left off with Matt and the gang setting out to save their deceased friend Baldwin from an eternity in Hel. This is no easy feat as along the way they encounter fire giants, Viking zombies, a seemingly innocuous river that turns out to be made up of acid, a cave bear, a Hel chicken, and Laurie and Fen’s Aunt Helen who rules Hel. Baldwin is the descendant of Balder and according to the mythos, his death was the start of Ragnarök. Saving him from Hel would change the myth and hopefully stop Ragnarök. But will that single act be enough to stop the end of the world?

The story of Odin’s Ravens is once again written as a shared point of view between the three main characters, Matt, Fen, and Laurie but we’re also introduced to a new character: Owen; the descendant of Odin. Odin was the All-Father and was said to be all-knowing of future events to come. Owen is blessed with this gift of prophecy as well as long as he wasn’t an active part of the mission so he has stayed away from the descendants in order to glean as much information as he can. Unfortunately, staying away from the other descendants has resulted in his capture by the wulfenkind. His two ravens, Thought (Huginn) and Memory (Muninn) are his sole companions until he’s able to escape so he sends them out into the world acting as his eyes and ears. It was incredibly interesting reading about the mythology behind Odin and remains one of my favorite aspects of these stories. The details of Norse mythology is incorporated into the story in a manner that makes it vastly interesting and educational yet still immensely entertaining.

In addition to the action and adventure of the story itself, the book also contains amazing black and white illustrations that truly bring the story to life. The interior illustrations were all done by Vivenne To.

Odin’s Ravens is a pleasing follow-up that will certainly leave readers of the series anticipating the final book in the trilogy. The action and adventure is intense, the humor is plentiful and the character development is well-done, although I can’t say I’m completely invested emotionally in these characters but their story is still very much intriguing and I’m eager to find out the result of their journey.

The Lightning Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians #1) by Rick Riordan {Purchase}
Gregor the Overlander (Underland Chronicles #1) by Suzanne Collins {Purchase}
Deadweather and Sunrise (The Chronicles of Egg #1) by Geoff Rodkey {PurchaseMy Review}

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Waiting on Wednesday – Odin’s Ravens (The Blackwell Pages #2) by K.L. Armstrong & M.A. Marr

September 25, 2013 Bonnie Waiting on Wednesday 0 Comments

Waiting on Wednesday – Odin’s Ravens (The Blackwell Pages #2) by K.L. Armstrong & M.A. MarrOdin's Ravens by K.L. Armstrong, M.A. Marr
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on May 13th 2014
Genres: Fantasy, Middle Grade
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Loki's Wolves, Odin's Ravens

Seven kids, Thor's hammer, and a whole lot of Valkyries are the only things standing against the end of the world.

When thirteen-year-old Matt Thorsen, a modern day descendant of the Norse god Thor, was chosen to represent Thor in an epic battle to prevent the apocalypse he thought he knew how things would play out. Gather the descendants standing in for gods like Loki and Odin, defeat a giant serpent, and save the world. No problem, right?

But the descendants' journey grinds to a halt when their friend and descendant Baldwin is poisoned and killed and Matt, Fen, and Laurie must travel to the Underworld in the hopes of saving him. But that's only their first stop on their journey to reunite the challengers, find Thor's hammer, and stop the apocalypse--a journey filled with enough tooth-and-nail battles and larger-than-life monsters to make Matt a legend in his own right.

Authors K.L. Armstrong and M.A. Marr return to Blackwell in the epic sequel to Loki's Wolves with more explosive action, adventure and larger-than-life Norse legends.

I’m a big fan of Middle Grade and Loki’s Wolves was a whole lot of fun. Been waiting anxiously for this installment! 

What are you waiting on this Wednesday?
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Early Review – Loki’s Wolves (Blackwell Pages #1) by K.L. Armstrong & M.A. Marr

April 27, 2013 Bonnie Book Reviews, Early Review, Middle Grade, Read in 2013 2 Comments

I received this book free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Loki’s Wolves (Blackwell Pages #1) by K.L. Armstrong & M.A. MarrLoki's Wolves by K.L. Armstrong, M.A. Marr
Series: The Blackwell Pages #1
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on May 7th 2013
Pages: 368
Genres: Fantasy, Middle Grade, Norse Mythology
Format: ARC
Source: the Publisher
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Odin's Ravens

three-half-stars

In Viking times, Norse myths predicted the end of the world, an event called Ragnarok, that only the gods can stop. When this apocalypse happens, the gods must battle the monsters--wolves the size of the sun, serpents that span the seabeds, all bent on destroying the world.

The gods died a long time ago.

Matt Thorsen knows every Norse myth, saga, and god as if it was family history--because it is family history. Most people in the modern-day town of Blackwell, South Dakota, in fact, are direct descendants of either Thor or Loki, including Matt's classmates Fen and Laurie Brekke.

However, knowing the legends and completely believing them are two different things. When the rune readers reveal that Ragnarok is coming and kids--led by Matt--will stand in for the gods in the final battle, he can hardly believe it. Matt, Laurie, and Fen's lives will never be the same as they race to put together an unstoppable team to prevent the end of the world.

Matt Thorsen has always had big shoes to fill considering his family are the descendants of the Norse god, Thor. When he has a dream of Ragnarok, the battle leading up to the end of the world, he doesn’t consider it being anything but a dream. Soon after, a town meeting is called and everyone is told that signs point to Ragnarok happening, and soon. When Matt is named champion he realizes he must seek out other descendant’s of the Gods if he has any hope of saving the world from destruction.

Regardless of the fact that this story closely resembles a Percy Jackson storyline and even Harry Potter at times, there are sufficient enough differences to make Loki’s Wolves stand apart.

First of all, I loved that the story wasn’t told solely through the POV of the ‘main character’, Matt the descendant of Thor. The POV was shared between the three main members of their team including Fen and Laurie, descendant’s of Loki. Each character was distinctive and well-written and it was enjoyable seeing the story from a set of different eyes.

Then there was also, of course, the difference that this book deals with Norse mythology. This was an exceptionally fun aspect for me considering I haven’t read too much relating to Norse mythology before so it was a bit of an educational experience for me.

This was an extremely fun and exciting thrill-ride of a novel; I enjoyed every minute of it. The ending was slightly abrupt, however, this is a trilogy and I do realize it had to end somewhere. There was a bit of a cliffhanger and no real resolution as their adventure is far from over. Highly recommended for adventurous Middle-Graders and Adults alike!

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Short & Sweet – The Cats of Tanglewood Forest by Charles de Lint

March 15, 2013 Bonnie Book Reviews, Middle Grade, Read in 2013, Short & Sweet Reviews 4 Comments

I received this book free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Short & Sweet – The Cats of Tanglewood Forest by Charles de LintThe Cats of Tanglewood Forest by Charles de Lint
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on March 5th 2013
Pages: 304
Genres: Fantasy, Middle Grade
Format: Hardcover
Source: the Publisher
Amazon
Goodreads

five-stars

The magic is all around you, if only you open your eyes....

Lillian Kindred spends her days exploring the Tanglewood Forest, a magical, rolling wilderness that she imagines to be full of fairies. The trouble is, Lillian has never seen a wisp of magic in her hills--until the day the cats of the forest save her life by transforming her into a kitten. Now Lillian must set out on a perilous adventure that will lead her through untamed lands of fabled creatures--from Old Mother Possum to the fearsome Bear People--to find a way to make things right.

In this whimsical, original folktale written and illustrated throughout in vibrant full color by two celebrated masters of modern fantasy, a young girl's journey becomes an enchanting coming-of-age story about magic, friendship, and the courage to shape one's own destiny


“Everything is a lesson if you’re willing to learn something from it.”

Twelve year old Lillian is an adventurous little girl who traverses the Tanglewood forest searching for fairies that she’s convinced exist. After she’s tragically bitten by a snake and dies, she hovers above her body long enough to witness the ring of cats that has surrounded her. Next thing she knows, she’s awake again and is now furry with paws. Seeking to find a way to rectify the situation, she seeks to change the past but in turn ends up living an even worse existence after her Aunt dies after being bitten by the snake instead.

“Maybe there’s a reason why the snake bit you, the cats changed you, and you’re no longer a girl. Maybe there’s something you can learn from being a cat instead of a girl.”

Tanglewood’s main lesson centers around how small choices can lead to surprisingly large consequences that you may not realize until it’s too late. Despite it’s fantasy elements, it still manages to be a lesson that can be understood and appreciated. Charles de Lint has crafted a perfectly charming folktale story and in addition to the enchanting art of Charles Vess this is one that children and adults both are sure to enjoy.

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Recommend A… Book You Read On a Vacation

September 10, 2012 Bonnie Recommend A... 0 Comments

Recommend A… Book You Read On a VacationI Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga
Series: Jasper Dent #1
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on April 3, 2012
Pages: 368
Genres: Horror, Mystery, Thriller
Format: Hardcover
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: I Hunt Killers, Game, Blood of My Blood

What if the world's worst serial killer...was your dad?

Jasper "Jazz" Dent is a likable teenager. A charmer, one might say.

But he's also the son of the world's most infamous serial killer, and for Dear Old Dad, Take Your Son to Work Day was year-round. Jazz has witnessed crime scenes the way cops wish they could—from the criminal's point of view.

And now bodies are piling up in Lobo's Nod.

In an effort to clear his name, Jazz joins the police in a hunt for a new serial killer. But Jazz has a secret—could he be more like his father than anyone knows?

Recommend A… is a new meme hosted by Chick Loves Lit. Every Monday is a new topic which allows participants to recommend a favorite book of theirs.
This week’s topic?

Recommend A…Book You Read On a Vacation

It took me FOREVER to get through this on my last vacation, despite how truly awesome this book is. My excuse is I just got engaged and I was totally in the mood for romance and not serial killers. 🙂 This was still one seriously awesome book though and I can’t wait for the next installment.
Read my review of this book here!
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Book Tour Review – I Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga

April 13, 2012 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2012, YA 2 Comments

Book Tour Review – I Hunt Killers by Barry LygaI Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga
Series: Jasper Dent #1
Published by Little Brown Books for Young Readers on April 3rd 2012
Pages: 368
Genres: Horror, Mystery
Format: ARC
Source: Book Tour
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Game, Blood of My Blood

four-half-stars

It was a beautiful day. It was a beautiful field.
Except for the body.

Jazz is a likable teenager. A charmer, some might say.

But he's also the son of the world's most infamous serial killer, and for Dear Old Dad, "Take Your Son to Work Day" was year-round. Jazz has witnessed crime scenes the way cops wish they could--from the criminals' point of view.

And now, even though Dad has been in jail for years, bodies are piling up in the sleepy town of Lobo's Nod. Again.

In an effort to prove murder doesn't run in the family, Jazz joins the police in the hunt for this new serial killer. But Jazz has a secret--could he be more like his father than anyone knows?

From acclaimed author Barry Lyga comes a riveting thriller about a teenager trying to control his own destiny in the face of overwhelming odds.

‘Jazz was afraid of two things in the world, and two things only.
One of them was that people thought that his upbringing meant that he was cursed by nature, nurture, and predestination to be a serial killer like his father.
The second thing…was that they were right. ‘

When a woman is found murdered in Lobo’s Nod, the last thing on anyone’s mind is that it could potentially be another serial killer because they’ve already dealt with one in their lifetime. Billy Dent was a local of Lobo’s Nod, who murdered into the triple digits, is behind bars but his son Jazz still lives in town with his Grandma. Having grown up with Billy and being taught everything he knew it was inevitable that Jazz would be far from a normal kid.

‘Jazz hadn’t given her many details of exactly what life in the Dent house had been like, but he’d told her enough that she knew it wasn’t hearts and flowers. Well, except for the occasional heart cut from a chest. And the kind of flowers you send to funerals.’

Since his father went to prison, Jazz has struggled with nightmares, memories, and the fear that he’s going to end up exactly like Dear Old Dad. When the woman is found murdered, Jazz feels that it really is another serial killer and he decides to use his knowledge to help find him since he knows exactly how the mind of a serial killer works.

Maybe it’s because I’m a big fan of mysteries/thrillers/true crime but this was a lot of fun. The subtle humor that Mr. Lyga managed to swirl into the mix was perfection and managed to really take the edge off the more gory bits. This was definitely raw and gruesome though, but it was extremely well done. The YA classification in this case definitely applies to the older YA crowd. I was really shocked at how detailed some of the crime scenes were described and a few of Jazz’s nightmares (which include cutting of human flesh and his fears that these aren’t nightmares at all). I’d only recommend this to fans of the genre that are able to stomach some pretty detailed descriptions.

I Hunt Killers definitely ends with the possibility for more but can work as a stand-alone novel as well. And apparently we actually can look forward to more as this is a planned trilogy.

Much thanks to Wendy Darling at The Midnight Garden for allowing me to be a part of her blog tour!

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