Category: YA

Early Review – Ashfall (Ashfall #1) by Mike Mullin

Posted July 29, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2011, YA / 4 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Ashfall (Ashfall #1) by Mike MullinAshfall by Mike Mullin
Series: Ashfall #1
Published by Tanglewood Press on October 14, 2011
Pages: 474
Genres: Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Ashen Winter, Sunrise

five-stars

Under the bubbling hot springs and geysers of Yellowstone National Park is a supervolcano. Most people don't know it's there. The caldera is so large that it can only be seen from a plane or satellite. It just could be overdue for an eruption, which would change the landscape and climate of our planet.

For Alex, being left alone for the weekend means having the freedom to play computer games and hang out with his friends without hassle from his mother. Then the Yellowstone supervolcano erupts, plunging his hometown into a nightmare of darkness, ash, and violence. Alex begins a harrowing trek to seach for his family and finds help in Darla, a travel partner he meets along the way. Together they must find the strength and skills to survive and outlast an epic disaster.

Ashfall was one of the most well written books I’ve read in a long time. I was so enthralled with this book that I read it a little bit at a time because I wanted to relish this book and all that it was about.

Ashfall is the story of Alex, a teenage boy learning to survive on his own after the Yellowstone super-volcano erupts. With the electricity out, the sun hidden behind a cloud of ash, and the obligation to remain indoors to keep from breathing in the deadly ash, Alex has to learn quickly what it takes to survive on his own. He takes shelter with his neighbors after his house becomes uninhabitable; however, after witnessing an intensely traumatic event he takes off on his own in hopes he can get to where his parents are: over 100 miles away. Alex doesn’t blink at the prospect of traveling 100 miles until he realizes that he’s going to need to do this on foot.

The Good
Everything, and I mean everything, about this novel was spot-on amazing. The relationship between Alex and Darla was so heartbreaking and realistic. At the point in the novel where Darla joins him on his journey to find his parents, they have become emotionally dependent on each other because they’re slowly realizing just how lonely the world has become. Watching Alex grow and develop in the novel was also pretty moving. Here’s a kid who at the beginning of the novel who was excited because his parents had left him home alone for the weekend for the first time in his life and he could do whatever he wanted. By the end of the novel that ‘Alex’ is long gone. The one thing that I found so incredible about this book was the complete and utter realism of the book. There’s no fluff to this story and you can truly imagine every single scenario actually happening. Overall, the story of survival and strength is a beautiful one.

The Bad
I was so overwhelmed by the end of this novel that I couldn’t express my opinions and views into sentences. This is not bad. This is me explaining that it took me about a month to finally be able to sort through all my thoughts in order to write my review and to be able to determine wholeheartedly that I enjoyed everything about this novel.

I loved at the end that the author Mike Mullin included information about the research he had done and how he had combined several scientific findings to create what he believed to be a realistic possibility if a Yellowstone super-volcano were to actually happen. Yes, it freaked me out a little (okay, maybe more than a little) at the prospect of something like this really occurring (and yes I totally freaked out at my complete lack of preparation for the end of the world). In the end though, this will now be one of my favorite books ever and I’ll be waiting anxiously (but not patiently) for the next chapter in the Ashfall series.

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Book Review – Rot and Ruin (Benny Imura #1) by Jonathan Maberry

Posted July 25, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA / 0 Comments

Book Review – Rot and Ruin (Benny Imura #1) by Jonathan MaberryRot and Ruin by Jonathan Maberry
Series: Benny Imura #1
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on September 14, 2010
Pages: 468
Genres: Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


two-half-stars

In the zombie-infested, post-apocalyptic America where Benny Imura lives, every teenager must find a job by the time they turn fifteen or get their rations cut in half. Benny doesn't want to apprentice as a zombie hunter with his boring older brother Tom, but he has no choice. He expects a tedious job whacking zoms for cash, but what he gets is a vocation that will teach him what it means to be human.

I’ve read several zombie books in the recent months. Because of this I know that it’s important for the author to come up with some original aspect to centralize their story around. I don’t feel that this book did it… what this book felt like to me was a typical YA story with zombies thrown in as an after-thought.

Rot & Ruin’s ‘original aspect’ focused on a group of people trying to change the world to make people see and understand that zombies don’t have any control over their actions and that they were once people and should be treated as such.

The society 14 years after ‘First Night’ is a far cry from the world today. People have developed a rut to the point where they have no desire to attempt taking back their world so they survive by living locked inside a chain link fence living in cabins and surviving without electricity. How zombies came to be is never explained either, which, I missed because I always love a good explanation for their existence. Even people who die of natural causes come back as zombies. But even after all this time, these people have chosen to live a stagnant life of monotony rather than attempt to grow and develop as a people and overcome the zombies. This line pretty much sums it up:

”Electronics and complex machines were no longer allowed in town, because of a strong religious movement that associated that kind of power with the “Godless behavior” that had brought about “the end.””

The Imura brothers, Tom and Benny, are in the zombie killing business… or more appropriately, they are in business to bring families peace of mind. Rather than just going out and mindlessly slaying zombies to be rid of them, they are hired by families to locate their zombiefied family members and kill them so that they can rest assured that they are no longer the walking dead going around munching on people. Num num.

There were a few other interesting tidbits to this story, like, “Gameland”. So apparently some really sick and twisted humans that were often described as being worse than the zombies (because the zombies of course don’t know what they’re doing and should be excused because they’ve got a bad case of the munchies) like to capture up small children and force them to fight against zombies. We never see Gameland, we just hear about it…. So that storyline kinda fell flat.

There was also the story about the “Lost Girl”. The girl who’s survived on her own for years. Benny first learns about her when he gets her ‘card’ in the latest batch of zombie cards. Yes, zombie cards. Much like your normal baseball cards, but with celebrity zombies, bounty hunters, etc. So yes, Benny gets the “Lost Girl” card and is immediately infatuated with her. It suddenly becomes his desire to find her, save her, and keep her from danger. Aw, here comes her knight in shining armor.

But the only thing I can think of is, here’s this 15 year old kid who just started training to be a zombie hunter less than week ago and he feels it’s his mission in life to now save this total bad ass Xena type zombie killing machine who’s been surviving on her own in the Rot & Ruin for YEARS… and Benny plans on saving her. With his wooden sword. Right.

By the time the ending came around I was truly bored. I think the complete predictability of the book had something to do with it but this story just lacked in overall excitement for me.

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Book Review – Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine #1) by Ransom Riggs

Posted July 16, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA / 0 Comments

Book Review – Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine #1) by Ransom RiggsMiss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
Series: Miss Peregrine #1
Published by Quirk Books on June 7, 2011
Pages: 386
Genres: Fantasy, Mystery, Time Travel
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


three-half-stars

As a kid, Jacob formed a special bond with his grandfather over his bizarre tales and photos of levitating girls and invisible boys. Now at 16, he is reeling from the old man's unexpected death. Then Jacob is given a mysterious letter that propels him on a journey to the remote Welsh island where his grandfather grew up. There, he finds the children from the photographs--alive and well--despite the islanders’ assertion that all were killed decades ago. As Jacob begins to unravel more about his grandfather’s childhood, he suspects he is being trailed by a monster only he can see. A haunting and out-of-the-ordinary read, debut author Ransom Rigg’s first-person narration is convincing and absorbing, and every detail he draws our eye to is deftly woven into an unforgettable whole. Interspersed with photos throughout, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children is a truly atmospheric novel with plot twists, turns, and surprises that will delight readers of any age.

‘I used to dream about escaping my ordinary life, but my life was never ordinary. I had simply failed to notice how extraordinary it was.’

Going into this book I had the impression that it would be this scary, ‘Shutter Island’ type novel. I also thought it was Adult Fiction. I was wrong on both counts; but was still not disappointed, the story was quite interesting.

‘Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children’ is the story of sixteen-year-old Jacob who has grown up listening to his grandfather’s tales of his younger years living in an orphanage with ‘Peculiar Children’ on an island off the coast of Wales. Jacob stopped believing his grandfather many years ago, but when his grandfather is attacked and dies mysteriously Jacob begins to wonder if his stories weren’t true after all. His grandfather’s dying words cause him to go in search of this mysterious island and to find the abandoned orphanage even though those children can’t still be alive… or can they?

I loved how the author incorporated all the old photographs into the story. Having something visual to relate the story to, made it much more interesting. I thought that the storyline was extremely original. It reminded me of those people that performed at the circus with the extraordinary powers, except these were children with extraordinary and they were all kept in an orphanage/school all Harry Potter/X-Men style. I also had no idea that this book was the start of a new series…the ending left me anxious in anticipation of what would happen next.

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Early Review – Ashes (Ashes Trilogy #1) by Ilsa J. Bick

Posted July 16, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2011, YA / 0 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Ashes (Ashes Trilogy #1) by Ilsa J. BickAshes by Ilsa J. Bick
Series: Ashes Trilogy #1
Published by EgmontUSA on September 6, 2011
Pages: 481
Genres: Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic, Zombies
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon
Goodreads


two-half-stars

Seventeen-year-old Alex is hiking through the wilderness when it happens: an earth-shattering electro-magnetic pulse that destroys almost everything. Survivors are divided between those who have developed a superhuman sense and those who have acquired a taste for human flesh. These flesh-hunters stalk the land: hungry, ruthless and increasingly clever. Alex meets up with Tom, a young army veteran, and Ellie, a lost girl, and they will fight together and be torn apart. Alex must face the most difficult question of all: in such vastly changed world, who can you trust?

‘Ashes’ is the story of Alex, a 17 year old girl with an inoperable brain tumor who leaves home by herself to go on a camping trip. While out in the wilderness, an event occurs that prevents the use of her electronic devices; she later discovers that an EMP had gone off and had not only shut down all electronic devices but killed billions. She begins caring for 8 year old Ellie as her grandfather was one of the first people killed by the EMP. Alex begins noticing that she’s changing in ways that she can’t explain. For one, her brain tumor had caused her to lose her sense of smell and taste but following the EMP those senses not only come back to her but they are heightened like never before. The changes continue in her throughout the story.

First impressions? Alex was not an immediately likable character but she does grow on you after some time. I’d say around the time the other main character, Tom, is introduced she starts acting like a likable human being.

Second? This CANNOT be a young adult book. This was one of the most gruesome books I have read in a LONG time. Not to say it wasn’t amazing, because it was, but planning meals around reading this book to make sure that you’re don’t have food in your stomach and/or are about to eat was essential. (I can stomach most things, I’m not exactly squeamish, but man can this author describe your internal organs. Lol)

One main issue I have with this book, which actually is an issue I have with many ‘YA’ books, is the situations that the author puts the characters in and how these characters act in these situations does not fit their age. The way that Alex acts in this book does not fit a 17 year old I don’t care how mature you are for your age. Tom was a bit more believable because he was in his 20’s and he had been in the army and had proper training and such.

Possible spoilers…

My second issue was the fact that the first half of the book was super exciting and I loved every minute of it. It seemed like as soon as I hit 50% it just went immediately downhill. She got to the town Rule and I got seriously lost because all of these new characters were thrown in the mix and I got so confused keeping everybody straight. Plus? No zombies. No gruesome gory internal organ comments. Just life in this weird religious cult amish society. Just weird. I was trending on 4 stars up until the second half. And I missed Tom. No Tom, no zombies, the second half sucked. The author seemed to be following an interesting path in the storyline but then at the half mark she went in a completely different direction and I didn’t like it one bit. It seemed to me as if the first half was about survival and the bonds of friendship and such, and then the second half turned into some weird love triangle and it was completely inappropriate as far as I’m concerned. Didn’t fit at all with the rest of the story.

Compared to the many other dystopian novels I’ve read recently, this one lacked the realism that many others had. Ashfall, for example, was believable and you could imagine each and every eventually happening. With this novel, I don’t know if these characters just had bad luck but it just seemed to me like they were constantly dealing with a ridiculous amount of shit. Sure the world has gone to hell, but these damn kids just could not catch a break. Maybe that’s the way it’ll truly be if things like this ever happen, but for me it just didn’t seem realistic.

It’s not often that I will read a book that is the start of a new series and not want to continue. There’s either a cliffhanger that forces me to or an overall desire to see what happens to the characters. The ending of this book did not have me feeling the need to continue, the last half of the book just ruined the good parts, very disappointed!

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Book Review – Blood Red Road (Dust Lands #1) by Moira Young

Posted July 16, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA / 2 Comments

Book Review – Blood Red Road (Dust Lands #1) by Moira YoungBlood Red Road by Moira Young
Published by Margaret K. McElderry Books on June 7th 2011
Pages: 480
Genres: Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon | Barnes & Noble
Goodreads

Also by this author: Rebel Heart, Raging Star

four-half-stars

Saba lives in Silverlake, a wasteland ravaged by constant sandstorms where her family scavenge from landfills left by the long-gone Wrecker civilization. After four cloaked horsemen kidnap her beloved twin brother Lugh, she teams up with daredevil Jack and the Free Hawks, a girl gang of Revolutionaries.

Saba learns that she is a fierce fighter, an unbeatable survivor, and a cunning opponent. And she has the power to take down a corrupt society from the inside. Saba and her new friends stage a showdown that change the course of her civilization.

It took me a good 10% before my brain had finally adjusted to the writing style of Moira Young. Really makes me wonder how long it took the author to write this… if she had to stop and say to herself, “No, that sentence is much too proper. ‘They pretend it warn’t nuthin to do with ‘em.’ There! Perfect.” But really, I don’t think a lot of people will be able to put up with this book for that exact reason. I still recommend giving it a shot though, it may surprise you.

Blood Red Road tells the story of Saba who sets out to get her brother Lugh back after he is captured by a group of horsemen. Together, with her younger sister Emmi, they leave the only home they’ve ever known to travel into the unknown. Saba intends on leaving Emmi with a nearby neighbor (although not neighbor in the natural sense; they don’t exactly live in suburbia), however; Emmi is a stubborn little shit and insists on coming with Saba. At first, the relationship between Saba and Emmi drove me nuts because those two COULD NOT get along and Saba was downright awful to her. Saba had blamed Emmi for their mother’s death because she died giving birth to Emmi. The change in their relationship throughout the book was done in baby steps, but once they started to care for each other it was really touching.

I loved the Free Hawks… talk about one awesome group of kick-ass girls.

The relationship between Saba and Jack… cracked me up, at times. Talk about a love hate relationship. I kept slapping my forehead over and over saying, “MAN! Saba really needs to lighten up! She is way too uptight for her own good.” But, when it came down to it, that’s just who Saba was and it was nice to have a not so typical character for once.

Speaking of ‘not so typical’… hellwurms. They have giant worms in this novel… and they are called hellwurms. (Well, they’re really just big worms but I felt the need to use Saba-talk). I recommend that when you get to the part where they are first mentioned? That you continue only if you have not eaten recently. Don’t know about you but those worms FREAKED ME OUT.

I’ve said too much already. Suffice it to say, I highly recommend this book… give it a shot, don’t let the Beverly hillbilly language throw you off, it’s really a great story I swear.

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Short Story Review – Daimon (Covenant 0.5) by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Posted July 16, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Read in 2011, Short Stories, YA / 0 Comments

Short Story Review – Daimon (Covenant 0.5) by Jennifer L. ArmentroutDaimon by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Published by Spencer Hill Press on May 10th 2011
Pages: 62
Genres: Demons, Fantasy, Paranormal
Format: eBook
Source: Freebie
Amazon
Goodreads


three-stars

"Love in my world usually ended up with someone hearing 'I smite thee ' as she was cursed to be some lame flower for the rest of her life." For three years, Alexandria has lived among mortals--pretending to be like them and trying to forget the duty she'd been trained to fulfill as a child of a mortal and a demigod. At seventeen, she's pretty much accepted that she's a freak by mortal standards... and that she'll never be prepared for that duty. According to her mother, that's a good thing.But as every descendant of the gods knows, Fate has a way of rearing her ugly head. A horrifying attack forces Alex to flee Miami and try to find her way back to the very place her mother had warned her she should never return-the Covenant. Every step that brings her closer to safety is one more step toward death... because she's being hunted by the very creatures she'd once trained to kill. The daimons have found her.

I’ve recently stumbled upon several series that offer little prequel books like this. I absolutely hate finishing a book, hating it, and feeling like I’ve wasted time in my life that I’m never going to get back so… I’ve begun reading prequels. I feel prequels give you a good sense of how the series is going to go and whether or not it’s worth pursuing. Fortunately, Daimon didn’t feel like a big time waster and I’m actually interested in continuing this series.

Daimon tells the story of Alexandria “Alex”, a child of a demi-god and a mortal, so not quite a demi-god but still has some of the powers. Alex and her mother have been hoping to escape detection of the daimon’s for the past 3 years while living among mortals after they fled in the middle of the night from the Covenant for a reason that Alex’s mother never explained. After being discovered by the daimon’s, Alex is forced to run away to escape them, but she has nowhere to go. The only place she knows to run is to the Covenant, but it’s the one place her mother always told her she could never go back to. The prequel ended with Alex still trying to reach the Covenant and outsmart the daimon’s chasing her. Very interested story, will definitely be adding the other books to my to-read list. 🙂

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Book Review – Ultraviolet (Ultraviolet #1) by R.J. Anderson

Posted July 16, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA / 1 Comment

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review – Ultraviolet (Ultraviolet #1) by R.J. AndersonUltraviolet by R.J. Anderson
Series: Ultraviolet #1
Published by Carolrhoda Lab on June 2nd 2011
Pages: 416
Genres: Romance, Sci-fi
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Quicksilver

four-stars

Once upon a time there was a girl who was special.
This is not her story.
Unless you count the part where I killed her.

Sixteen-year-old Alison has been sectioned in a mental institute for teens, having murdered the most perfect and popular girl at school. But the case is a mystery: no body has been found, and Alison's condition is proving difficult to diagnose. Alison herself can't explain what happened: one minute she was fighting with Tori -- the next she disintegrated. Into nothing. But that's impossible. Right?

 

‘I realized then that even though I was a tiny speck in an infinite cosmos, a blip on the timeline of eternity, I was not without purpose. And as long as I had a part in the music of the spheres, even if it was only a single grace note, I was not worthless. Nor was I alone.’

Right off the bat this reminded me of ‘My Soul to Lose’ – girl wakes up in mental institution with no idea how she got there. Luckily that’s where the resemblance stopped. Ultraviolet is about 16 year old Alison Jeffries who is placed in Pine Hills, a psychiatric treatment center, with no idea at first of why she’s there. Slowly the memories start coming back to her of an altercation she had with popular girl Tori Beaugrand the same day the police are now claiming she disappeared and hasn’t been seen since.

Alison’s been placed in a mental institution because its believed that something is mentally wrong with her. When just the opposite is true. She has an extremely rare and special ability. Her ability reminded me of the girl off of the TV show Heroes who could see the colors that sounds created, Emma? Anyways, the story was good and and despite the fact that I’m not that big of a sci-fi fan this was hugely enjoyable.

The story builds off of Alison’s gift and you slowly learn more and more about it. She has synesthesia and is such an interesting and eye-opening neurological condition, I highly recommend googling it and reading more about it. Yep, it’s a real thing. By the time the end rolls around the story explodes and becomes something so much more than you could have even begun to anticipate. You finally realize what’s been going on all this time and what actually happened to Tori. Huge shockers. It was fantastic and nothing like what I was expecting.

I ended up editing this review after finding out that this is in fact a part of a series and that more information/answers can be expected. The one thing that I discovered upon editing this review (over a year after reading) was that this was still extremely clear in my head. I read so many books that I find most of them just get lost in the ‘shuffle’ and similar story lines and they all just inevitably blend together. Ultraviolet is still completely clear in my hand and stands in a category on its own in my opinion. This was fantastic and I’m so glad that we have more story to look forward. Highly recommended.

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Book Review – Paranormalcy (Paranormalcy #1) by Kiersten White

Posted July 16, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA / 0 Comments

Book Review – Paranormalcy (Paranormalcy #1) by Kiersten WhiteParanormalcy by Kiersten White
Series: Paranormalcy #1
Published by HarperTeen on August 31, 2010
Pages: 368
Genres: Fantasy, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


two-half-stars

Weird as it is working for the International Paranormal Containment Agency, Evie’s always thought of herself as normal. Sure, her best friend is a mermaid, her ex-boyfriend is a faerie, she's falling for a shape-shifter, and she's the only person who can see through paranormals' glamours, but still. Normal.

Only now paranormals are dying, and Evie's dreams are filled with haunting voices and mysterious prophecies. She soon realizes that there may be a link between her abilities and the sudden rash of deaths. Not only that, but she may very well be at the center of a dark faerie prophecy promising destruction to all paranormal creatures.

So much for normal.

Okay so the main character Evie is like some Paranormal Agent for the International Paranormal Contaimment Agency (IPCA). Right off the bat this book reminded me of Ally Carter’s Gallagher Girls series…just with a vampire here and a mermaid there. It’s an easy read but I have a hard time with YA novels that are extremely immature. For example, one of the intro lines about her taser is pink with rhinestones and named Tasey. That was almost too much for me.

The story continues with Evie doing her job to capture paranormals and bring them back to the agency for their protection or if they’re wreaking havoc on humans. All kinds of paranormals too; werewolves, vampires, mermaids, shapeshifters, banshees… hags? There’s also an underlying story about Evie and her kind of ex-boyfriend faerie. I found him extremely creepy and didn’t like him one bit. Or Raquel. That woman sighed way too damn much.

Once the story picked up around the halfway point, it actually got pretty interesting, but there was just something about this story that didn’t click with me. Not sure what exactly. Maybe it was the continued reference to Tasey and her pink knife.

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Short Story Review – Winter’s Passage (Iron Fey #1.5) by Julie Kagawa

Posted July 16, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Read in 2011, Short Stories, YA / 0 Comments

Short Story Review – Winter’s Passage (Iron Fey #1.5) by Julie KagawaWinter's Passage by Julie Kagawa
Series: The Iron Fey #1.5
Published by Harlequin Teen on May 20, 2010
Pages: 51
Genres: Fantasy, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Purchased
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: The Iron King, The Iron Daughter, The Iron Knight

three-stars

Meghan Chase used to be an ordinary girl... until she discovered that she is really a faery princess. After escaping from the clutches of the deadly Iron fey. Meghan must follow through on her promise to return to the equally dangerous Winter Court with her forbidden love, Prince Ash. But first, Meghan has one request: that they visit Puck - Meghan's best friend and servant of her father, King Oberon - who was gravely injured defending Meghan from the Iron Fey. Yet Meghan and Ash's detour does not go unnoticed. They have caught the attention of an ancient, powerful hunter - a foe that even Ash may not be able to defeat.

So this is a short quick little interlude between stories… there was a lot of reiteration of stuff that happened in the first book. If it’s been a while since you read Iron King (#1) then this would be a nice little refresher for you. I had just finished Iron King though so the reiteration was a little, well, repetitive. 🙂

This story is about Ash taking Meghan back to his Queen in accordance with their agreement and the introduction of yet another elusive creature following her; the Hunter (Or the self-proclaimed Wolf from Little Red Riding Hood. Yeah… okay. lol) Grimalkin joins them on their journey as well, and I don’t know why but I love Grim. Although when I envision the story as it progresses, I imagine Grimalkin looks like the white fluffy Fancy Feast cat for some reason. lol

Of course since Grim is supposed to be a ‘faery cat’ (whatever that means) I’m sure that’s not the case. But to me, that’s Grim. Grim and his Fancy Feast.

As far as Ash and Meghan go… as much as I love Ash, the storyline is getting old. Boy likes girl, girl likes boy… they’re not supposed to like each other, it’s not allowed, but they just can’t help it! So boy acts like he cares, but wait! Boy turns into a prick faster than a speeding bullet! Come on… *sigh* I’m still a sucker for these books and will keep reading this series. This mini-book actually made me more interested in the series overall so that works, mainly because I’m interested to see what happens once they actually reach the Winter Court and what all these weird dreams are all about.

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Short and Sweet Review – The Iron King (Iron Fey #1) by Julie Kagawa

Posted July 16, 2011 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA / 0 Comments

Short and Sweet Review – The Iron King (Iron Fey #1) by Julie KagawaThe Iron King by Julie Kagawa
Series: The Iron Fey #1
Published by Harlequin Teen on January 26th 2010
Pages: 368
Genres: Fantasy, Romance
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Winter's Passage, The Iron Daughter, The Iron Knight

two-stars

Meghan Chase has a secret destiny--one she could never have imagined...

Something has always felt slightly off in Meghan's life, ever since her father disappeared before her eyes when she was six. She has never quite fit in at school...or at home.

When a dark stranger begins watching her from afar, and her prankster best friend becomes strangely protective of her, Meghan senses that everything she's known is about to change.

But she could never have guessed the truth-- that she is the daughter of a mythical faery king and is a pawn in a deadly war. Now Meghan will learn just how far she'll go to save someone she cares about, to stop a mysterious evil no faery creature dare face...and to find love with a young prince who might rather see her dead than let her touch his icy heart.

The story is about Meghan Chase, a normal girl living in a small town with poor parents and her 4 year-old brother. Meghan discovers that she’s the daughter of a mythical faery king and of course gets involved in a faery war.

For some reason I couldn’t get into The Iron King no matter how hard I tried. It took me almost a week to read and for me that’s pretty much unheard of. I had heard such great things about this entire series and I was really looking forward to it but the storyline was just so-so. I loved the parts about Ash. I had heard everybody rave about Ash so I couldn’t wait for him to be introduced… unfortunately that didn’t even happen till almost halfway through the book. The story just lacked originality for me and I would like to continue the series, I just won’t be doing it immediately.

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