Book Review – Seven Deadly Sins by Corey Taylor

July 31, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2011 0 Comments

Book Review – Seven Deadly Sins by Corey TaylorSeven Deadly Sins: Settling the Argument Between Born Bad and Damaged Good by Corey Taylor
Published by Da Capo Press on July 12th 2011
Pages: 256
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Memoir, Non-Fiction
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
Goodreads

Also by this author: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven, House of Gold & Bones, You're Making Me Hate You: A Cantankerous Look at the Common Misconception That Humans Have Any Common Sense Left

five-stars

For the first time, Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman Corey Taylor speaks directly to his fans and shares his worldview about life as a sinner. And Taylor knows how to sin. As a small-town hero in the early '90s, he threw himself into a fierce-drinking, drug-abusing, hard-loving, live-for-the moment life. Soon Taylor's music exploded, and he found himself rich, wanted, and on the road. His new and ever-more extreme lifestyle had an unexpected effect, however; for the first time, he began to actively think about what it meant to sin and whether sinning could--or should--be recast in a different light. Seven Deadly Sins is Taylor's personal story, but it's also a larger discussion of what it means to be seen as either a "good" person or a "bad" one. Yes, Corey Taylor has broken the law and hurt people, but, if sin is what makes us human, how wrong can it be?

“The seven deadly sins are bullshit.”

And so it begins… the book I’ve wanted to read the second I found out about it. And I’m so very happy to say that I wasn’t disappointed, displeased, or dissatisfied in anyway. This book is not; however, for the masses. For starters, this book is not an autobiography of Corey Taylor’s life and is not some in-depth heartfelt retelling of his life of sin. It may be a retelling of his life of sin, but it’s far from heartfelt. It’s honest, straightforward, brutal, and in your face. It’s definitely off the wall and all over the place; but that’s what makes it great.

“This book is a few parts flight, a handful of fancy, and a lot of why there is such a thing as freedom of the soul.”

This book is not only entertaining and funny as hell, but Corey Taylor’s thoughts and opinions were pretty damn great. This is where the honest and in your face comes into play. His thoughts and opinions totally go against every typical conformist belief and will more than likely succeed in offending many. I on the other hand, think he’s brilliant.

“So the misguided acts of my past have brought me to the virtues of my present and will hopefully lead me to the grace of my future. But I do not consider them “sins.” I consider the mistakes, capriciousness in the face of youthful abandon.”

The few reviews I have read on this book show people complaining about the lack of depth and how he’s one big narcissist and needs to be more socially responsible. Number one, this is Corey fucking Taylor and he’s wearing horns, smoking a cigarette, and drinking on the very front cover. What’d you expect? Number two, the man is only speaking the truth. He may be a little crazy and may not be the socially responsible human being you’d like him to be, but personally, I’ll take this Corey Taylor any day. He’s hilariously entertaining and I hope he continues writing in the future.

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Book Review – Tighter by Adele Griffin

July 30, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA 1 Comment

Book Review – Tighter by Adele GriffinTighter by Adele Griffin
Published by Knopf Books for Young Readers on May 10th 2011
Pages: 224
Genres: Contemporary, Ghosties, Mystery
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


four-stars

When 17-year-old Jamie arrives on the idyllic New England island of Little Bly to work as a summer au pair, she is stunned to learn of the horror that precedes her. Seeking the truth surrounding a young couple's tragic deaths, Jamie discovers that she herself looks shockingly like the dead girl—and that she has a disturbing ability to sense the two ghosts. Why is Jamie's connection to the couple so intense? What really happened last summer at Little Bly? As the secrets of the house wrap tighter and tighter around her, Jamie must navigate the increasingly blurred divide between the worlds of the living and the dead.

Brilliantly plotted, with startling twists, here is a thrilling page-turner from the award-winning Adele Griffin.

I love a good ghost story. One of my favorites of all time is Heart-Shaped Box. Now that is one freaky book. I was a little skeptical about going into this with high expectations since it is YA and all; it turned out to be one of the darker types of YA books.

Jamie is a very disturbed 17 year-old with an awful pill addiction. After suffering a back injury she hasn’t been able to quite kick the habit. Her mother, concerned with her recent behavior and thinking she may be suffering from depression, helps set her up with a job as an au pair for an old friend on the island of Little Bly in New England. Jamie is skeptical about taking this job but thinks it may in fact be a good idea; that maybe by the time she got back, they’d be gone. They being the two ghosts that haunt her, her Uncle Jim and second cousin Hank… both individuals committed suicide. Jamie has seen them both ever since the night she personally contemplated suicide.

Upon arriving at Little Bly Jamie finds out that the child, Isa, her last au pair Jessie was killed in a plane crash when her boyfriend Peter was flying. Jamie’s unsettled to see how the town residents stare at her… because Jamie is the spitting image of Jessie. It doesn’t help matters when Jamie starts to see Peter and Jessie, ghosts, just like her Uncle Jim and Hank.

The book was certainly a tad unnerving, as can be expected with ghost stories. But the author… her writing style was crazy. Jamie would be in the middle of thinking something and right in the middle she would say something else and have seemingly zero awareness of what she just said For example:

“I knew I needed more socializing than just interacting with Connie and Isa and Milo; even a daily phone call with Mags would have helped, but the longer I stuck with just myself, the more messed up I might become rapping at the windows crying at the locks and it was beginning to bother me how much.”

Crying at the locks? What the hell are you talking about?! What’s going on?? But the writing was great; I loved how it always kept me guessing. And guessing you do… right up until the very end; I gasped. It’s one of those books where when you finally realize what’s going on it makes you have to stop, think, and look back at all that’s happened… makes you rethink everything.

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Book Review – The Train by Georges Simenon

July 29, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2011 1 Comment

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review – The Train by Georges SimenonThe Train by Georges Simenon
Published by Melville House on July 12, 2011
Pages: 162
Genres: Historical Fiction
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon
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two-half-stars

Against all expectations Marcel Féron has made a “normal” life in a bucolic French suburb in the Ardennes. But on May 10, 1940, as Nazi tanks approach, this timid, happy man must abandon his home and confront the “Fate” that he has secretly awaited. Separated from his pregnant wife and young daughter in the chaos of flight, he joins a freight car of refugees hurtling southward ahead of the pursuing invaders. There, he meets Anna, a sad-looking, dark- haired girl, whose accent is “neither Belgian nor German,” and who “seemed foreign to everything around her.” As the mystery of Anna’s identity is gradually revealed, Marcel leaps from the heights of an exhilarating freedom to the depths of a terrifying responsibility—one that will lead him to a blood-chilling choice.

When it first appeared in English in 1964, British novelist and critic Brigid Brophy declared The Train to be “the novel his admirers had been expecting all along from Simenon.” Until The Train, she wrote, the dazzlingly prolific novelist had been “a master without a masterpiece.”

The Train is a poignant novel about Marcel Feron and his pregnant wife and young daughter living the “normal” life he had always hoped for in the French suburb Ardennes. On May 10, 1940 they woke up to find that the Nazi’s were coming and they were being forced into leaving behind all that they held dear. Marcel packs his family up and they get on the train meant to take them away from the danger. Throughout the train ride Marcel relives the day when him and his wife first met, their first train ride together, and all that she represented.

“For me, she was not just a woman; but the symbol of a normal regular life.”

The morning of May 10, 1940 did not result in panic for Marcel, rather he had always felt that this was bound to happen, that he would be forced to leave behind everything, and that he was going to confront the “Fate” that he has been secretly awaiting for years. When he becomes separated from his wife and child he finds himself surrounded by strangers but as the train travels further away from home their faces start to become familiar to him; and that’s when he meets Anna.

The panic and urgency of everyone leaving their homes and being separated from their family’s causes them to change and feel ‘outside ordinary life and its conventions.’ The affair he ends up having with Anna becomes the sole focus of the book and it seemed at first to be quite strange and peculiar, but it transpired as a result of the shock from leaving their ordinary lives behind. It may not have been acceptable under normal circumstances, but the circumstances were far from normal. He continues searching for his family but stays with Anna till the very end. It was quite sad when the two finally parted ways.

“I hope you’ll be happy, Marcel. I’ve been happy with you.”

The author’s writing style felt choppy and stilted. I’m not sure if this was in fact due to the author’s writing style or if it was simply because of the translation between languages. Overall, this was an interesting reflection of WWII but also of the human response to traumatic situations and the bonds that we create with individuals out of the instinctual need to grasp at life.

“For the first time in my life I had said ‘I love you’ like that, from the depths of my heart. Perhaps it wasn’t she that I loved, but life?”

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Early Review – Ashfall (Ashfall #1) by Mike Mullin

July 29, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2011, YA 4 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Ashfall (Ashfall #1) by Mike MullinAshfall by Mike Mullin
Series: Ashfall #1
Published by Tanglewood Press on October 14, 2011
Pages: 474
Genres: Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Ashen Winter, Sunrise

five-stars

Under the bubbling hot springs and geysers of Yellowstone National Park is a supervolcano. Most people don't know it's there. The caldera is so large that it can only be seen from a plane or satellite. It just could be overdue for an eruption, which would change the landscape and climate of our planet.

For Alex, being left alone for the weekend means having the freedom to play computer games and hang out with his friends without hassle from his mother. Then the Yellowstone supervolcano erupts, plunging his hometown into a nightmare of darkness, ash, and violence. Alex begins a harrowing trek to seach for his family and finds help in Darla, a travel partner he meets along the way. Together they must find the strength and skills to survive and outlast an epic disaster.

Ashfall was one of the most well written books I’ve read in a long time. I was so enthralled with this book that I read it a little bit at a time because I wanted to relish this book and all that it was about.

Ashfall is the story of Alex, a teenage boy learning to survive on his own after the Yellowstone super-volcano erupts. With the electricity out, the sun hidden behind a cloud of ash, and the obligation to remain indoors to keep from breathing in the deadly ash, Alex has to learn quickly what it takes to survive on his own. He takes shelter with his neighbors after his house becomes uninhabitable; however, after witnessing an intensely traumatic event he takes off on his own in hopes he can get to where his parents are: over 100 miles away. Alex doesn’t blink at the prospect of traveling 100 miles until he realizes that he’s going to need to do this on foot.

The Good
Everything, and I mean everything, about this novel was spot-on amazing. The relationship between Alex and Darla was so heartbreaking and realistic. At the point in the novel where Darla joins him on his journey to find his parents, they have become emotionally dependent on each other because they’re slowly realizing just how lonely the world has become. Watching Alex grow and develop in the novel was also pretty moving. Here’s a kid who at the beginning of the novel who was excited because his parents had left him home alone for the weekend for the first time in his life and he could do whatever he wanted. By the end of the novel that ‘Alex’ is long gone. The one thing that I found so incredible about this book was the complete and utter realism of the book. There’s no fluff to this story and you can truly imagine every single scenario actually happening. Overall, the story of survival and strength is a beautiful one.

The Bad
I was so overwhelmed by the end of this novel that I couldn’t express my opinions and views into sentences. This is not bad. This is me explaining that it took me about a month to finally be able to sort through all my thoughts in order to write my review and to be able to determine wholeheartedly that I enjoyed everything about this novel.

I loved at the end that the author Mike Mullin included information about the research he had done and how he had combined several scientific findings to create what he believed to be a realistic possibility if a Yellowstone super-volcano were to actually happen. Yes, it freaked me out a little (okay, maybe more than a little) at the prospect of something like this really occurring (and yes I totally freaked out at my complete lack of preparation for the end of the world). In the end though, this will now be one of my favorite books ever and I’ll be waiting anxiously (but not patiently) for the next chapter in the Ashfall series.

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Night of a Million Books

July 29, 2011 Bonnie Uncategorized 0 Comments

World Book Night is coming to the U.S.! Mark your calendar: April 23, 2012.

Imagine being given 48 copies of one of your favorite books for free to give to anyone you want. That’s the basic idea behind World Book Night, which was held for the first time in the U.K. this past March 5. Participants chose one of 25 titles, and then received 48 copies of the book and gave them out to anyone they wanted.

To read more about this event click the following link below:

Night of a Million Books

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Early Review – Unclaimed (Turner #2) by Courtney Milan

July 29, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2011 1 Comment

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Unclaimed (Turner #2) by Courtney MilanUnclaimed by Courtney Milan
Series: Turner #2
Published by HQN Books on September 27th 2011
Pages: 426
Genres: Historical Romance
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon | Barnes & Noble
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Also by this author: Unlocked, Unveiled

four-half-stars

Her only hope for survival...

Handsome, wealthy and respected, Sir Mark Turner is the most sought-after bachelor in all of London and he's known far and wide for his irreproachable character. But behind his virtuous reputation lies a passionate nature he keeps carefully in check...until he meets the beautiful Jessica Farleigh, the woman he's waited for all his life.

Is to ruin the man she loves...

But Jessica is a courtesan, not the genteel lady Sir Mark believes. Desperate to be free of a life she despises, she seizes her chance when Mark's enemies make her an offer she can't refuse--seduce Mark and tarnish his good name, and a princely sum will be hers. Yet as she comes to know the man she's sworn to destroy, Jessica will be forced to choose between the future she needs and the love she knows is impossible.

Beware of Spoilers! 🙂

Sir Mark Turner, a Victorian-era ‘rock star’, has done the impossible: he’s made chastity popular. After writing ‘A Gentleman’s Practical Guide to Chastity’ he himself becomes practically a celebrity and is loved by many but certainly not all. Hating his popularity he seeks to get some peace in the country. Jessica Farleigh is a courtesan who agrees to seduce Mark Turner for the sole purpose of ruining his spotless reputation. She is to seduce him and share the story of it so that it can be published for all to read about in London. When Mark meets Jessica, his plans to get some peace in the country are blown out of the water because soon enough she’s all he can think about.

I absolutely loved this novel. LOVED it. Not quite sure what it was about it specifically but it was one of the best romance novels I’ve read. Considering I haven’t read a ton of them so my opinion may not be worth much, but this is my review, so I can gush all I want! Haha Maybe I was really in the mood for a romance novel… maybe this novel really is that good… maybe it was both.

Neither Mark nor Jessica should be taken at face value because both individuals have a secret depth to them that was quite intriguing and really made the story. The author did an amazing job of rather than revealing all the secrets and laying them all out immediately but uncovered them layer by layer. It really made the change in emotions of the characters, their thought processes, and overall actions… well, you understood them. They made sense. It wasn’t whimsical. You came to conclusions with them and their actions became ones you would make and it made me feel so involved and wrapped in the story that normal. Okay so re-reading that, it sounds like total bullshit, but that’s the best I can explain it. Lol

I loved the characters… eventually. I thought Mark Turner was a pompous ass at first but then you discover more about him and it made him totally lovable. I loved Jessica immediately but my love for her kind of resembled a roller coaster. I kept changing my mind about her if she actually did go through with seducing him and telling his private story to the world. I breathed a sigh of relief when she finally told him the truth but then my heart broke for her when he walked away from her. And then I almost hated her again when she sold the story… but then it turned out to be a completely different story. Not the story of his private life.

I was totally trending on giving this 5 stars because I loved it so much. But then it’s almost like the end turned into the total typical kind of romance… Where she knows she loves him and then someone sends a threatening letter and she keeps it from him even though if she told him he’d be able to fix it and then she starts treating him super awful to the point where you want to slap the bitch because she’s trying to run him off … *yawn* But I can understand why it had to be included, still didn’t like it though.

All in all, by the end, I was still plenty happy and really enjoyed this. Will definitely be looking for more Courtney Milan in the future.

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Cookbook Review – Quick-Fix Gluten Free by Robert Landolphi

July 28, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2011 0 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Cookbook Review – Quick-Fix Gluten Free by Robert LandolphiQuick-Fix Gluten Free by Robert Landolphi
on August 23, 2011
Pages: 184
Genres: Non-Fiction
Format: eBook
Source: Netgalley
Amazon
Goodreads


three-stars

Gluten-free professional chef Robert M. Landolphi proves that a gluten-free lifestyle doesn't have to be bland and boring, labor-intensive, or time consuming inside Quick-Fix Gluten Free. In preparation for his follow-up to Gluten Free Every Day Cookbook, Landolphi queried fans about their biggest gluten-free challenges and created Quick-Fix Gluten Free in response to the dishes.

Divided into nine sections delving into everything from appetizers and breakfast to hearty, internationally inspired dishes, fan favorite comfort foods and decadent sweets and treats, Quick-Fix Gluten Free offers 100 fast and easily prepared recipes for crave-worthy dishes like Cinnamon Dusted French Toast, Kickin' Paella, Gnocchi with Roasted Garlic Butter and Parmesan Cheese, and Aunt Lil's Rich and Creamy Cheesecake. With a focus on fast, fresh and flavorful, these contemporary dishes are simple enough for everyday meals and delicious enough to serve to anyone--whether they are on a gluten-free diet or not.

Whether your choice to live gluten free is driven by the desire to lose weight, comply with a celiac diet, the need to avoid wheat because of mild allergies or the suspected link between gluten and autism, Quick-Fix Gluten Free proves that once-taboo foods like crusty breads, creamy pastas and indulgent cakes are no longer off-limits.

This cookbook is a Gluten-Free recipe guide with foods that actually sound good; something that you might actually want to consume! Which, take it from me, I’ve searched high and low for decent sounding gluten free dishes and this one definitely gets your mouth watering. Only problem that I have is, and it’s a total personal problem, is that these dishes are sometimes very labor intensive and aren’t exactly quick. I have a pretty busy lifestyle and sometimes I just need a recipe where I can throw stuff together, heat it up, and call it done. But considering I’m gluten-free, that’s not always easy for me (read, never). My other problem, personal again, is that I also tend to stay away from dairy and I can’t have eggs, period. So a few of these recipes that I’ve taken note of to make in the near future will take some editing but overall I definitely like the looks of this cookbook, I have made some of these recipes with success, and will definitely keep this on hand to try more of his recipes in the future.

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Early Review – Seduced by Her Highland Warrior (MacKinloch Clan, #2) by Michelle Willingham

July 27, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2011 0 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Seduced by Her Highland Warrior (MacKinloch Clan, #2) by Michelle WillinghamSeduced by Her Highland Warrior by Michelle Willingham
Series: MacKinloch Clan #2
Published by Harlequin Historical on August 1, 2011
Pages: 287
Genres: Historical Romance
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon
Goodreads


three-stars

The MacKinloch Clan Highland warriors prepared to fight fiercely for their country...and for love

BACK IN HER HUSBAND’S BED

Alex MacKinloch is chief of his clan and, in these dark times of unrest, he has united his people. The void between him and his wife is proving a much harder challenge. When Alex discovers Laren has been keeping secrets from him, his thinly veiled frustration can no longer be contained.

The pleasures of the marital bed seem long forgotten to Laren. Yet her warrior husband is looking at her with increasingly hungry eyes... This powerful highlander has seduction on his mind and his wife in his sights!

I’m typically a sucker for a good Highlander romance so I quickly snagged this one up. I went into this with the impression that it would be your typical romance story but this novel really surprised me with how heartfelt and touching it was.

‘Seduced by her Highland Warrior’ is the second installment in the MacKinloch Clan series. I did not read the first novel and even though it did kind of feel like in the beginning I had walked into the story halfway through, the author did a fine job in still making it work as a stand-alone novel.

Alex MacKinloch is chief of his clan and is trying to get everyone to work together to rebuild their keep that was recently destroyed by the English. His wife, Laren, is an intensely shy woman who has difficulty adjusting to her roles and responsibilities when her husband becomes chief. Born to a poor family, she is looked down upon by other members of the clan and is treated unfairly because of their beliefs that Alex should not have married her.

Alex and Laren haven’t been close for almost 3 years now after the loss of their newborn son causes them to drift apart when they don’t know how to comfort each other from the pain it caused them both. I loved how the story shows glimpses of the past back when the two of them first met, fell in love, and also tells what happened between them after the death of their son.

This story while sad and touching was also hopeful because even though they had drifted apart they did still love each other and were doing all they could to work on things between them. Watching the story progress and seeing the two become closer was very moving, yet also extremely believable. I really enjoyed this one.

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Short and Sweet Review – At Grave’s End (Night Huntress, #3) by Jeaniene Frost

July 26, 2011 Bonnie Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2011 0 Comments

Short and Sweet Review – At Grave’s End (Night Huntress, #3) by Jeaniene FrostAt Grave's End by Jeaniene Frost
Series: Night Huntress #3
Published by HarperCollins on December 20th 2008
Pages: 339
Genres: Romance, Urban Fantasy
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Halfway to the Grave

three-half-stars

It should be the best time of half-vampire Cat Crawfield’s life. With her undead lover Bones at her side, she’s successfully protected mortals from the rogue undead. But though Cat’s worn disguise after disguise to keep her true identity a secret from the brazen bloodsuckers, her cover’s finally been blown, placing her in terrible danger.

As if that wasn’t enough, a woman from Bones’s past is determined to bury him once and for all. Caught in the crosshairs of a vengeful vamp, yet determined to help Bones stop a lethal magic from being unleashed, Cat’s about to learn the true meaning of bad blood. And the tricks she’s learned as a special agent won’t help her. She will need to fully embrace her vampire instincts in order to save herself—and Bones—from a fate worse than the grave.

‘At Graves End’: the third installment in the Night Huntress series.

Cat and Bones are back working together doing what they do best: killing vampires. Their latest mission goes awry when Cat is recognized even with all of her disguises. To keep from putting her in constant danger the decision is made to put someone else on the front lines. The story continues with all the usual ‘Night Huntress’ craziness we’ve all come to expect: a vampire in a Chuck E Cheese costume, family reunions with a dad set on destroying her, friends become vampires, vampire alliances, crazy new mind reading powers, and… I think you get the picture.

I rather did enjoy this installment and not having to grumble through pages after pages of her annoying beyond on reason mother. If you can believe it, the woman actually does have a sense of humor, and it’s finally decided to bust on out. Certainly not soon enough but better late than never. The little love triangle between Bones, Cat, and Tate grated on my nerves a tiny bit. But I got over it. Because this series is pretty great.

And the best part…in the end?? Who do they battle? None other than my favorite un-dead creature ever! Yep, you guessed it. View Spoiler » hahahaha

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Book Review – Rot and Ruin (Benny Imura #1) by Jonathan Maberry

July 25, 2011 Bonnie Book Reviews, Read in 2011, YA 0 Comments

Book Review – Rot and Ruin (Benny Imura #1) by Jonathan MaberryRot and Ruin by Jonathan Maberry
Series: Benny Imura #1
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on September 14, 2010
Pages: 468
Genres: Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


two-half-stars

In the zombie-infested, post-apocalyptic America where Benny Imura lives, every teenager must find a job by the time they turn fifteen or get their rations cut in half. Benny doesn't want to apprentice as a zombie hunter with his boring older brother Tom, but he has no choice. He expects a tedious job whacking zoms for cash, but what he gets is a vocation that will teach him what it means to be human.

I’ve read several zombie books in the recent months. Because of this I know that it’s important for the author to come up with some original aspect to centralize their story around. I don’t feel that this book did it… what this book felt like to me was a typical YA story with zombies thrown in as an after-thought.

Rot & Ruin’s ‘original aspect’ focused on a group of people trying to change the world to make people see and understand that zombies don’t have any control over their actions and that they were once people and should be treated as such.

The society 14 years after ‘First Night’ is a far cry from the world today. People have developed a rut to the point where they have no desire to attempt taking back their world so they survive by living locked inside a chain link fence living in cabins and surviving without electricity. How zombies came to be is never explained either, which, I missed because I always love a good explanation for their existence. Even people who die of natural causes come back as zombies. But even after all this time, these people have chosen to live a stagnant life of monotony rather than attempt to grow and develop as a people and overcome the zombies. This line pretty much sums it up:

”Electronics and complex machines were no longer allowed in town, because of a strong religious movement that associated that kind of power with the “Godless behavior” that had brought about “the end.””

The Imura brothers, Tom and Benny, are in the zombie killing business… or more appropriately, they are in business to bring families peace of mind. Rather than just going out and mindlessly slaying zombies to be rid of them, they are hired by families to locate their zombiefied family members and kill them so that they can rest assured that they are no longer the walking dead going around munching on people. Num num.

There were a few other interesting tidbits to this story, like, “Gameland”. So apparently some really sick and twisted humans that were often described as being worse than the zombies (because the zombies of course don’t know what they’re doing and should be excused because they’ve got a bad case of the munchies) like to capture up small children and force them to fight against zombies. We never see Gameland, we just hear about it…. So that storyline kinda fell flat.

There was also the story about the “Lost Girl”. The girl who’s survived on her own for years. Benny first learns about her when he gets her ‘card’ in the latest batch of zombie cards. Yes, zombie cards. Much like your normal baseball cards, but with celebrity zombies, bounty hunters, etc. So yes, Benny gets the “Lost Girl” card and is immediately infatuated with her. It suddenly becomes his desire to find her, save her, and keep her from danger. Aw, here comes her knight in shining armor.

But the only thing I can think of is, here’s this 15 year old kid who just started training to be a zombie hunter less than week ago and he feels it’s his mission in life to now save this total bad ass Xena type zombie killing machine who’s been surviving on her own in the Rot & Ruin for YEARS… and Benny plans on saving her. With his wooden sword. Right.

By the time the ending came around I was truly bored. I think the complete predictability of the book had something to do with it but this story just lacked in overall excitement for me.

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