Genre: Funny-ha-ha

National Book Award 2015 Finalist – Nimona by Noelle Stevenson

Posted November 7, 2015 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Graphic Novel, Read in 2015, YA / 3 Comments

National Book Award 2015 Finalist – Nimona by Noelle StevensonNimona by Noelle Stevenson
Published by HarperTeen on May 12th 2015
Pages: 272
Genres: Fantasy, Funny-ha-ha
Format: Paperback
Source: Library
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three-stars

The full-color graphic novel debut from rising star Noelle Stevenson, based on her beloved and critically acclaimed web comic, which Slate awarded its Cartoonist Studio Prize, calling it “a deadpan epic”

Nimona is an impulsive young shape-shifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren’t the heroes everyone thinks they are.

But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart realizes that Nimona’s powers are as murky and mysterious as her past. And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.

Nemeses! Dragons! Science! Symbolism!

All these and more await in this brilliantly subversive, sharply irreverent epic from Noelle Stevenson, based on the web comic Slate called “funny and vibrant, with wonderful energy in Stevenson’s illustrations and a wicked wit in her storytelling.”

Featuring an exclusive epilogue not seen in the web comic, along with bonus conceptual sketches and revised pages throughout, this gorgeous full-color graphic novel is perfect for the thousands of fans of the web comic and is sure to win Noelle many new ones.

Nimona is a shapeshifter. She’s also hilarious and set on world domination which is why she asked to join up with the designated villain of the kingdom, Lord Ballister Blackheart. The two set out to bring down the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics as well as Blackheart’s bitter rival (and ex-best friend) Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin. Behind Nimona’s fantastic sense of humor is a seemingly somber past that we only see a hint of. The former webcomic is now printed and bound and is sure to be loved.

Okay, so, despite my middle-of-the-road rating, I really did enjoy this. Nimona was hilarious and all over the place and the graphics were enjoyable as well. I wanted more character building though. The hints about Nimona’s past should have been more than just hints and the evil government was a bit too stereotypical. The board game scene had me absolutely dying because if I could breathe fire, that’s totally how it’d be like playing board games with me as well.

I picked this up though because it’s a part of my National Book Award Finalist experiment. It was fun. I enjoyed it. But being nominated for the National Book Award?

Not to be a party-pooper or anything. I love seeing a young author being nominated. I love seeing a graphic novel being nominated. But in my opinion, it shouldn’t have made the cut, and that’s what my experiment is all about. Setting all that aside though, this is one for all you graphic novel lovers looking for a good laugh.

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Waiting on Wednesday – Brighter Than the Sun (Charley Davidson #8.5) by Darynda Jones

Posted September 16, 2015 by Bonnie in Waiting on Wednesday / 3 Comments

Waiting on Wednesday – Brighter Than the Sun (Charley Davidson #8.5) by Darynda JonesBrighter Than the Sun by Darynda Jones
Series: Charley Davidson #8.5
Published by St. Martin's Griffin on October 6th 2015
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Paranormal, Urban Fantasy
Format: eBook
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Also by this author: First Grave on the Right, For I Have Sinned, Second Grave on the Left

All his life, Reyes Alexander Farrow has suffered the torments of the damned. Only one thing has given him hope: the woman who radiates a light that no mortals can see; a light that only the departed can see...

Told from his point of view, BRIGHTER THAN THE SUN chronicles the first time Reyes ever encountered Charley, and how their relationship has been the one thing that can either save him or doom him.

About Darynda Jones

NYTimes and USA Today Bestselling Author Darynda Jones has won numerous awards for her work, including a prestigious RITA, a Golden Heart, and a Daphne du Maurier. As a born storyteller, she grew up spinning tales of dashing damsels and heroes in distress for any unfortunate soul who happened by, annoying man and beast alike. She currently has two series with St. Martin's Press, the Charley Davidson Series and the Darklight Trilogy. Darynda lives in the Land of Enchantment, also known as New Mexico, with her husband of more than 25 years and two beautiful sons, the Mighty, Mighty Jones Boys. She can be found at www.daryndajones.com.

I don’t usually go super crazy over novellas, especially ones where they switch up the POV of the typical character, but I’m totally making an exception for one of my favorite series of all time. Charley Davidson is hilarious beyond belief but this story switches it up to tell the story from Reyes’ point of view. This should be interesting. 🙂

What are you waiting on this Wednesday? Leave me a link to your post and I’ll be sure to stop by!

dvd-pearl

Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Jill @ Breaking the Spine

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Early Review – You’re Making Me Hate You: A Cantankerous Look at the Common Misconception That Humans Have Any Common Sense Left by Corey Taylor

Posted June 26, 2015 by Bonnie in Adult, Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2015 / 0 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – You’re Making Me Hate You: A Cantankerous Look at the Common Misconception That Humans Have Any Common Sense Left by Corey TaylorYou're Making Me Hate You: A Cantankerous Look at the Common Misconception That Humans Have Any Common Sense Left by Corey Taylor
Published by Da Capo Press on July 7th 2015
Pages: 256
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Non-Fiction
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
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Also by this author: Seven Deadly Sins: Settling the Argument Between Born Bad and Damaged Good, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Heaven, House of Gold & Bones

four-stars

In the tradition of the late great George Carlin, New York Times bestselling author and lead singer of Slipknot and Stone Sour Corey Taylor sounds off in hilarious fashion about the many vagaries of modern life that piss him off.

Whether it’s people’s rude behavior in restaurants and malls, the many indignities of air travel, eye-searingly terrible fashion choices, dangerously clueless drivers, and—most of all—the sorry state of much modern music, Taylor’s humor and insight cover civil society’s seeming decline—sparing no one along the way, least of all himself.

Holding nothing back and delivered in Taylor’s inimitable voice, You’re Making Me Hate You is a cathartic critique of the strange world in which we find ourselves.

“…can’t people just not fucking suck as human beings once in a while? […] People have just as much capacity to be good as they do to be shit. It’s a choice. People make choices. So they need to make better fucking choices.”

Being that this is Corey Taylor’s third book you think I’d be used to his absolutely impeccable way of putting into words all the bitching and complaining that runs through my head, but I am. Like all the times when I’m confronted with the idiocy of this planet be it by their ridiculous purchases, their laughable choice in music or they way they choose to raise (or not raise as the case may be) their children. We’re all confronted with the insanity on a daily basis but we’re forced to suffer through, internally rolling our eyes at the imbeciles. But Corey manages to transform the suffering into entertainment in the form of a hilarious memoir once again.

“Incompetent people don’t know they’re incompetent. They just blithely blunder through their day-to-day with no care for any damage that happens in their wakes. When the mishaps are pointed out, they see the issue but don’t do anything to adjust and fix their ways.”

You know those people you encounter that seem as if they were put on Earth just to make your life miserable? Or how about those times you witness some type of human behavior that causes you to simultaneously stop to worry for the human race while also thinking “What in the fuck is wrong with people!?” If you’ve had thoughts such as those, this is the book for you. If not, back away slowly. Not one to mince words, Corey Taylor points out all the issues in society and human behavior in general without a care for hurt feelings. He’s blunt, honest, and always candid. You gotta love that about him.

“When people suffer under the illusion that their time and attention is more important than everyone else’s, no matter how mundane the occasion may be, I snap like a piece of dried-up driftwood, waiting to be set fire at the pyre.”

Corey Taylor has successfully covered the argument between good and evil, the existence of the supernatural and now the lack of common sense of the human race. I can’t wait to see what he comes up with next.

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Waiting on Wednesday – The Dirt on Ninth Grave (Charley Davidson #9) by Darynda Jones

Posted June 24, 2015 by Bonnie in Adult, Waiting on Wednesday / 8 Comments

Waiting on Wednesday – The Dirt on Ninth Grave (Charley Davidson #9) by Darynda JonesThe Dirt on Ninth Grave by Darynda Jones
Series: Charley Davidson #9
Published by St. Martin's Press on January 5th 2016
Pages: 352
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Urban Fantasy
Format: Hardcover
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Also by this author: First Grave on the Right, For I Have Sinned, Second Grave on the Left

Grim Reaper Charley Davidson is back in the ninth installment of Darynda Jones' New York Times bestselling paranormal series

In a small village in New York Charley Davidson is living as Jane Doe, a girl with no memory of who she is or where she came from. So when she is working at a diner and slowly begins to realize she can see dead people, she's more than a little taken aback. Stranger still are the people entering her life. They seem to know things about her. Things they hide with lies and half-truths. Soon, she senses something far darker. A force that wants to cause her harm, she is sure of it. Her saving grace comes in the form of a new friend she feels she can confide in and the fry cook, a devastatingly handsome man whose smile is breathtaking and touch is scalding. He stays close, and she almost feels safe with him around.

But no one can outrun their past, and the more lies that swirl around her-even from her new and trusted friends-the more disoriented she becomes, until she is confronted by a man who claims to have been sent to kill her. Sent by the darkest force in the universe. A force that absolutely will not stop until she is dead. Thankfully, she has a Rottweiler. But that doesn't help in her quest to find her identity and recover what she's lost. That will take all her courage and a touch of the power she feels flowing like electricity through her veins. She almost feels sorry for him.

About Darynda Jones

NYTimes and USA Today Bestselling Author Darynda Jones has won numerous awards for her work, including a prestigious RITA, a Golden Heart, and a Daphne du Maurier. As a born storyteller, she grew up spinning tales of dashing damsels and heroes in distress for any unfortunate soul who happened by, annoying man and beast alike. She currently has two series with St. Martin's Press, the Charley Davidson Series and the Darklight Trilogy. Darynda lives in the Land of Enchantment, also known as New Mexico, with her husband of more than 25 years and two beautiful sons, the Mighty, Mighty Jones Boys. She can be found at www.daryndajones.com.

Charley Davidson series

 photo PicMonkey Collage_5.jpg

First Grave on the Right (Charley Davidson #1) {PurchaseMy Review}
Second Grave on the Left (Charley Davidson, #2) {PurchaseMy Review}
Third Grave Dead Ahead (Charley Davidson, #3) {Purchase}
Fourth Grave Beneath My Feet (Charley Davidson, #4) {PurchaseMy Review}
Fifth Grave Past the Light (Charley Davidson, #5) {PurchaseMy Review}
Sixth Grave on the Edge (Charley Davidson, #6) {PurchaseMy Review}
Seventh Grave and No Body (Charley Davidson, #7) {Purchase}
Eighth Grave After Dark (Charley Davidson, #8) {Purchase}

Never have I still been still so completely invested in a series by the ninth installment. I’m absolutely nuts about this series. And after the previous installments ending? Good grief, just give me this book already.

What are you waiting on this Wednesday? Leave me a link to your post and I’ll be sure to stop by!

dvd-pearl

Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Jill @ Breaking the Spine

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Early Review – The Awesome by Eva Darrows

Posted May 21, 2015 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2015 / 5 Comments

I received this book free from the Author in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – The Awesome by Eva DarrowsThe Awesome by Eva Darrows
Published by Ravenstone on May 26th 2015
Pages: 352
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Urban Fantasy
Format: eARC
Source: the Author
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four-half-stars

Seventeen-year-old Maggie Cunningham is tough, smart, and sassy. She's also not like other girls her age, but then, who would be when the family business is monster hunting? Combat boots, ratty hooded sweatshirts, and hair worn short so nothing with claws can get a grip, Maggie's concerns in life slant more toward survival than fashion or boys.

Which presents a problem when Maggie's mother informs her that she can't get her journeyman's license for hunting until she loses her virginity. Something about virgin blood turning vampires into pointy rage monsters. Insides being on the outside and all that.

Maggie's battled zombies and goblins and her fair share of house brownies, but finding herself a boy proves a much more daunting task than any monster hunt. Did you know normal girls don't stuff their bras with holy water balloons? Nor do they carry wooden stakes in their waistbands. And they care about things like "matching" and "footwear." Of course, they also can't clean a gun blindfolded, shoot a crossbow, or exorcise ghosts from a house. Which means they're lame and Maggie's not. Because Maggie's awesome. The Awesome, in fact.

Just ask her. She'd be more than happy to tell you.

After she finds herself a date.

About Eva Darrows

Eva Darrows is Hillary Monahan is also an international woman of mystery. Holed up in Massachusetts with three smelly basset hounds, she writes funny, creepy things for fun and profit.

‘Sure, I was good at a lot of stuff. How many girls my age could kill a dude with her bare hands in under fourteen seconds? That’s a skill, and one that’d get me places in life, but it didn’t help me here. All the combat training in the world couldn’t make being a normal teenager any easier.’

Being a teenager is hard. Being a teenager is even more difficult when your only interaction with that age group is via the television. Seventeen-year-old Maggie has been home-schooled by her single mother who also happens to be a monster hunter (think Van Helsing in the modern age.) Maggie has been trained since she was young to do the job as well and is completely content with the cards that life has dealt her with one small issue: becoming a full-fledged, licensed monster hunter requires her to lose her virginity. Easier said than done.

Okay, not to be totally lame, but this really was awesome. And extremely hilarious. Not only was Maggie fantastically snarky, and sure often times undignified and more than a bit crass, but she was such an amazingly confident character that you cannot help but love her. She’s realistically awkward when it comes to her “first time” but honestly the best thing about it is how awesome the topic of virginity was handled. (Yes, I know, I’ve already said awesome twice. It’s FITTING though.) It’s all displayed in such a non-shaming way and I loved the comfortableness between Maggie and her mother in how the topic broached. There wasn’t any awkwardness and her mother was straight up and honest with her about using protection and about being confident and comfortable with her body. While the summary implies that the sole focus of the story is Maggie losing her virginity, it’s actually so much more and bottom line, the relationship between Maggie and her mother is the very best.

“You’ll go on that date tomorrow, and before you get all pissy-pants over the suggestion, listen to me, Margaret Jane. […] I tell you that because life goes on despite our jobs. It’s too short not to have fun while we can. Sitting at home with guns and silver expecting the worst is no way to live. Trust me on that. I know.”

The relationship/friendship between Maggie and her mom reminded me a lot of my relationship with my mom, except alas, we don’t go out hunting vampires and other night beasties together. My mom was also one of those awesome women that didn’t tread lightly around the topic of sex and seeing how vastly different other parents handle that subject makes me forever thankful to her for that. It’s a natural thing that shouldn’t have a taboo placed around it. It’s something I feel should be openly discussed because having someone to answer those difficult questions will only lead to smart decisions in the future. Seeing the topic of sex addressed in that way and a parental relationship like that is rare in fiction, but shouldn’t be so.

The Awesome takes Maggie on a hilariously snarky, undead adventure that will leave you eager for more. While satisfying enough as a stand-alone, this still has definite room to grow, and I definitely want more.

First Grave on the Right (Charley Davidson #1) by Darynda Jones {Purchase – Review}
Croak (Croak #1) by Gina Damico {PurchaseReview}
Bad Taste in Boys (Kate Grable #1) by Carrie Harris {Purchase – Review}

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Waiting on Wednesday – Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson

Posted April 8, 2015 by Bonnie in Waiting on Wednesday / 9 Comments

Waiting on Wednesday – Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny LawsonFuriously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson
Published by Flatiron Books on September 22nd 2015
Pages: 352
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Memoir
Format: Hardcover
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Also by this author: Let's Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir)

A new book by #1 NYT bestselling author Jenny Lawson about the most compelling theme in her work: living with severe depression and mental illness-and taxidermied roadkill raccoons.

"We're all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it." -John Hughes

In Furiously Happy, a humor memoir tinged with just enough tragedy and pathos to make it worthwhile, Jenny Lawson, the Bloggess, examines her own experience with severe depression and a host of other conditions, and explains how it has led her to live life in the fullest:

"According to the many shrinks I've seen in the last two decades, I am a high-functioning depressive with severe anxiety disorder, mild bipolar tendencies, moderate clinical depression, mild self-harm issues, impulse control disorder, and occasional depersonalization disorder. Also, sprinkled in like paprika over a mentally unbalanced deviled egg, are mild OCD and trichotillomania.... I've often thought that people with severe depression have developed such a well for experiencing extreme emotion that they might be able to experience extreme joy in a way that 'normal people' also might never understand. And that's what Furiously Happy is all about."

Jenny's first book, Let's Pretend This Never Happened, sold over 400,000 copies. Her blog receives between 1-2 million page views per month and she has nearly 400,000 Twitter followers; her platform has grown exponentially since her first book and continues to expand. Her readings were standing room only, with fans lining up to have Jenny sign their bottles of Xanax or Prozac as often as they were to have her sign their books. Furiously Happy will appeal to Jenny's core fan base but will also transcend it. There are so many people out there struggling with depression and mental illness, either themselves or someone in their family-and in Furiously Happy they will find a member of their tribe offering up an uplifting message; via a taxidermied roadkill raccoon. Let's Pretend This Never Happened ostensibly was about embracing your own weirdness, but deep down it was about family. Furiously Happy is about depression and mental illness, but deep down it's about joy-and who doesn't want a bit more of that?

About Jenny Lawson

Known for her sardonic wit and her hysterically skewed outlook on life, Jenny Lawson has made millions of people question their own sanity, as they found themselves admitting that they, too, often wondered why Jesus wasn't classified as a zombie, or laughed to the point of bladder failure when she accidentally forgot that she mailed herself a cobra. Her blog (www.thebloggess.com) is award-winning and extremely popular.

Even if I hadn’t read this authors previous memoir (and loved it) this would be going on my TBR for that hilarious cover alone. I mean seriously, look at that fucking thing. I can’t stop laughing.

What are you waiting on this Wednesday? Leave me a link to your post and I’ll be sure to stop by!

Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Jill @ Breaking the Spine

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Book Review – Cat Out of Hell by Lynne Truss

Posted March 12, 2015 by Bonnie in Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2015 / 3 Comments

I received this book free from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Book Review – Cat Out of Hell by Lynne TrussCat Out of Hell by Lynne Truss
Published by Melville House on March 3rd 2015
Pages: 256
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Horror
Format: eARC
Source: Edelweiss
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
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one-half-stars

Acclaimed New York Times bestselling author Lynne Truss (Eats, Shoots & Leaves) is back with a mesmerizing and hilarious tale of cats and murder

For people who both love and hate cats comes the tale of Alec Charlesworth, a librarian who finds himself suddenly alone: he’s lost his job, his beloved wife has just died. Overcome by grief, he searches for clues about her disappearance in a file of interviews between a man called “Wiggy” and a cat, Roger. Who speaks to him.

It takes a while for Alec to realize he’s not gone mad from grief, that the cat is actually speaking to Wiggy… and that much of what we fear about cats is true. They do think they’re smarter than humans, for one thing. And, well, it seems they are! What’s more, they do have nine lives. Or at least this one does – Roger’s older than Methuselah, and his unblinking stare comes from the fact that he’s seen it all.

And he’s got a tale to tell, a tale of shocking local history and dark forces that may link not only the death of Alec’s wife, but also several other local deaths. But will the cat help Alec, or is he one of the dark forces?

In the deft and comedic hands of mega-bestseller Lynne Truss, the story is as entertaining as it is addictive” (The Sunday Telegraph) – an increasingly suspenseful and often hysterically funny adventure that will please cat lovers and haters alike. And afterwards, as one critic noted, “You may never look at a cat in quite the same way again” (The Daily Mail).

‘All of this story, remember, is based on the completely unacceptable and ludicrous premise of an evil talking cat called Roger that traveled romantically in the footsteps of Lord Byron in the 1930s and now solves cryptic crosswords torn out daily from the Telegraph.’

I’m all about dark humor (and if we’re being completely honest, anything involving cats) so when I read numerous reviews describing this novel as such, I jumped at the chance to read it. Sad to say, the ‘humor’ of this completely escaped me. Remember that horrible cheese-fest of a movie Cats & Dogs about a top secret war going on between, well, Cats & Dogs? The cats were all evil bastards trying to take over the world and man’s best friend was trying to foil their plans. So basically, just replace dogs with humans and you’ve got the plot of this story.

Our narrator, Alec, is a librarian who is mourning the sudden loss of his wife, Mary. Alec immerses himself in a collection of documents consisting of audio transcripts, e-mails, and photographs describing the story of a man called “Wiggy” who has just lost his sister. His story also includes the tale of a talking cat named Roger, a member of a satanic cult of immortal cats with a blood feud against humans. Roger begins to tell his life story to Wiggy, à la Interview with the Vampire.

‘”Why are cats so pissed off all the time? They get all the best seats in the house, they have food and warmth and affection. Everything is on their terms, not ours. They come and go as they please. Why aren’t they permanently ecstatic?” Well, now it’s explained. It’s because they’re conscious of having lost their ability to do serious evil, and they feel bloody humiliated.’

The included pop culture references with Roger having a voice like Vincent Price and is described as the feline equivalent of Stephen Fry (whatever that’s supposed to mean) and Alec’s dog Watson having a voice exactly like Daniel Craig, took this story even further into ridiculous territory. The fast-paced narrative, I had assumed was done in an attempt to recreate the sense of panic the characters were dealing with, came off as lazy and sloppy rather than thrilling and frenetic. But then we get to the end and we’re even told:

‘So that’s nearly the end, and I’d like to finish my account with an apology. Reading it all back, I realise that at times I have been a tad flippant in the way I have written this, and I have also told the story with what appears to be a lamentable lack of narrative organisation.’

So basically the author realized what a hot mess she just wrote and instead of going back and fixing it had her character apologize like it’s his fault. Well, whoever you want to blame, I still can’t accept it.

Maybe I took it all too seriously. Maybe I wouldn’t have if I would have known it was like LOLCats in novel form. And maybe there’s some hidden allegory I was supposed to uncover that would have allowed me the ‘a-ha!’ moment where it all makes sense. Unfortunately, that moment never came.

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Waiting on Wednesday – The Awesome by Eva Darrows

Posted December 10, 2014 by Bonnie in Waiting on Wednesday / 7 Comments

Waiting on Wednesday – The Awesome by Eva DarrowsThe Awesome by Eva Darrows
Published by Ravenstone on May 26th 2015
Pages: 352
Genres: Fantasy, Funny-ha-ha
Format: Paperback
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
Goodreads

Also by this author: The Awesome

Seventeen-year-old Maggie Cunningham is tough, smart, and sassy. She's also not like other girls her age, but then, who would be when the family business is monster hunting? Combat boots, ratty hooded sweatshirts, and hair worn short so nothing with claws can get a grip, Maggie's concerns in life slant more toward survival than fashion or boys. Which presents a problem when Maggie's mother informs Maggie that she can't get her journeyman's license for hunting until she loses her virginity.

Something about virgin blood turning vampires into pointy rage monsters. Blood and gore and insides being on the outside and all that.

Maggie's battled ghosts and goblins and her fair share of house brownies, but finding herself a boy - fitting in with her peers - proves a much more daunting task than any monster hunt. Did you know normal girls don't stuff their bras with holy water balloons? Nor do they carry wooden stakes in their waistbands. And they care about things like "matching" and "footwear." Of course, they also can't clean a gun blindfolded, shoot a crossbow, or exorcise ghosts from a house. Which means they're lame and Maggie's not. Because Maggie's awesome. The Awesome, in fact. Just ask her. She'd be more than happy to tell you.

After she finds herself a date.

About Eva Darrows

Eva Darrows is Hillary Monahan is also an international woman of mystery. Holed up in Massachusetts with three smelly basset hounds, she writes funny, creepy things for fun and profit.

This sounds HILARIOUS and Maggie (the main character) sounds like she could totally be friends with Lex which is a-okay with me. This author also wrote MARY: The Summoning which was well written and definitely creepy!

What are you waiting on this Wednesday? Leave me a link to your post and I’ll be sure to stop by!

Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Jill @ Breaking the Spine

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Book Review – Texts from Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters by Mallory Ortberg

Posted November 21, 2014 by Dani in Dani's Reviews / 1 Comment

Book Review – Texts from Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters by Mallory OrtbergTexts from Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters by Mallory Ortberg
Published by Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) on November 4th 2014
Pages: 240
Genres: Books-About-Books, Classics, Funny-ha-ha
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
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Also by this author: Texts from Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters

four-stars

Hilariously imagined text conversations—the passive aggressive, the clever, and the strange—from classic and modern literary figures, from Scarlett O’Hara to Jessica Wakefield.

Mallory Ortberg, the co-creator of the cult-favorite website The Toast, presents this whimsical collection of hysterical text conversations from your favorite literary characters. Everyone knows that if Scarlett O’Hara had an unlimited text-and-data plan, she’d constantly try to tempt Ashley away from Melanie with suggestive messages. If Mr. Rochester could text Jane Eyre, his ardent missives would obviously be in all-caps. And Daisy Buchanan would not only text while driving, she’d text you to pick her up after she totaled her car. Based on the popular web-feature, Texts from Jane Eyre is a witty, irreverent mashup that brings the characters from your favorite books into the twenty-first century.

PLATO: okay Glaucon so
i want you to picture a cave full of prisoners
who have been in the cave their whole lives
and they’re all shackled up in a line facing the back wall

GLAUCON: my god
what a nightmare
those poor people

ok no

Texts from Jane Eyre is a compilation of Mallory Ortberg’s regular contribution to The-Toast.net. Ortberg reimagines famous literary characters’ conversations via text, from classic figures like Medea and Don Quixote, to more contemporary ones like Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen. Ortberg’s writing is witty and smart, yet remarkably still holds true to the original works the texts reference.

 

KING LEAR: okay who wants a kingdom

GONERIL: me
me I do

how much do you love me

oh my god
how much DON’T I love you is a better question
i love you like i love eyes
or outer space
or standing up
or even this question
ahhhh that’s so much haha

After Emily Dickinson, some of my favorites in this collection were King Lear and Hamlet. As a Shakespeare buff, these made me bust up laughing. Ortberg strips the story down to the nitty-gritty in a way that is like nothing I have ever read – think No Fear Shakespeare but ruthlessly bitchy. She is the snarky classmate I never had, blatantly calling Hamlet a little shit, and Plato and William Blake psychopathic monsters (which they totally are).

 

LORD BYRON: uuuuuuuughhh
nothing’s any good

what’s the matter

EVERYTHING
do you realize i’m never going to be able to have sex with the rain

i didn’t know you wanted to have sex with the rain

of course i want to have sex with the rain
how can you even say that
i feel like you don’t even know me

Beware! I suspect this book is only hilarious if you have a working knowledge of the classic and modern tales Ortberg pulls from. While I knew the bulk of the stories, the last time I read a few was more than a decade ago; some of the more recent books I have never read, like Sweet Valley High or The Babysitter’s Club. I didn’t read or reread anything, because yikes, but I did hit the highlights on the internet for more LOLs – and it was totally worth it.

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Book Review – Lola and the Boy Next Door (Anna and the French Kiss #2) by Stephanie Perkins

Posted November 15, 2014 by Dani in Dani's Reviews / 0 Comments

Book Review – Lola and the Boy Next Door (Anna and the French Kiss #2) by Stephanie PerkinsLola and the Boy Next Door by Stephanie Perkins
Series: Anna and the French Kiss #2
Published by Dutton Juvenile on September 29th 2011
Pages: 384
Genres: Contemporary Romance, Funny-ha-ha
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
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In this companion novel to Anna and the French Kiss, two teens discover that true love may be closer than they think

Budding designer Lola Nolan doesn't believe in fashion . . . she believes in costume. The more expressive the outfit - more sparkly, more fun, more wild - the better. But even though Lola's style is outrageous, she's a devoted daughter and friend with some big plans for the future. And everything is pretty perfect (right down to her hot rocker boyfriend) until the dreaded Bell twins, Calliope and Cricket, return to the neighborhood.

When Cricket - a gifted inventor - steps out from his twin sister's shadow and back into Lola's life, she must finally reconcile a lifetime of feelings for the boy next door.

Anna and the French Kiss series

Anna and the French Kiss (Anna and the French Kiss #1) by Stephanie Perkins {PurchaseReview}

The one. It stops my heart. I thought Max was the one, but… there’s that other one. The first one.”

Dolores Nolan, aka “Lola”, is in quite a pickle. She is madly in love with Max, an older guy in a band. Max never wants to hang around Lola’s friends and only tolerates Sunday brunch with her dads Andy and Nathan. Simply, Max is a bad guy, but Lola is too blinded to realize he has little regard for her feelings. Enter Cricket – the first love who got away – and Lola’s new next-door neighbor. Lola’s feelings come rushing back, causing her to question every interaction when her heart already knows the answer.

In this book, Perkins tackles much more adult and complex issues than in her previous work, especially around the idea of family. Lola’s family dynamic strays from the “normal” nuclear family. Her dads adopt Lola from her teenage/junkie/homeless parents at birth. Lola’s mother happens to be one of her dad’s sisters, and she only appears in need of rescue.

“We take each other in. My mind spins as it tries to connect the Cricket of the present with the Cricket of the past. He’s grown up and grown into his body, but it’s still him. The same boy I fell in love with in the ninth grade. My feelings had been building since our childhood, but that year, the year he turned sixteen, was the year everything changed.” 

Perkins has a gift for making her characters fall in love at the right pace. Lola has to work on her relationships and struggles with decisions about to whom her heart really belongs. Oh, Lola. I know this girl. I have been this girl. While there is no instant gratification in her works, the extra strain tugs on heart strings, makes her characters seem more human, and the payoff is so worth it. I read a lot of girly love stories, but I connected with this book more than I have with any other because of its realism. Or rather realism AND a happy ending.

My least favorite part of Lola and the Boy Next Door is that it was marketed as “Anna and the French Kiss #2” – which is certainly is not. While my beloved Anna and Étienne do make appearances as supporting characters, I was expecting more of their wonderful love story with her at film school, him at Berkeley. This is a completely trivial complaint, but the only one I have for this book. Instead of my usual list of recommendations, I am going to stick to one that I haven’t even read yet. If you liked Anna and Lola, you must read Isla and the Happily Ever After.

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