Genre: Funny-ha-ha

Early Review – One Plus One by Jojo Moyes

Posted June 28, 2014 by Bonnie in Adult, Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2014 / 7 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – One Plus One by Jojo MoyesOne Plus One by Jojo Moyes
Published by Pamela Dorman Books on July 1st 2014
Pages: 384
Genres: Contemporary Romance, Funny-ha-ha
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository
Goodreads

Also by this author: Me Before You, The Girl You Left Behind, Still Me

five-stars

One single mom. One chaotic family. One quirky stranger. One irresistible love story from the New York Timesbestselling author of Me Before You
 
American audiences have fallen in love with Jojo Moyes. Ever since she debuted stateside, she has captivated readers and reviewers alike, and hit the New York Times bestseller list with the word-of-mouth sensation, Me Before You. Now, with One Plus One, she’s written another contemporary opposites-attract love story that reads like a modern-dayTwo for the Road.
 
Suppose your life sucks. A lot. Your husband has done a vanishing act, your teenage stepson is being bullied and your math whiz daughter has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that you can’t afford to pay for. That’s Jess’s life in a nutshell—until an unexpected knight-in-shining-armor offers to rescue them. Only Jess’s knight turns out to be Geeky Ed, the obnoxious tech millionaire whose vacation home she happens to clean. But Ed has big problems of his own, and driving the dysfunctional family to the Math Olympiad feels like his first unselfish act in ages . . . maybe ever.
 
One Plus One is Jojo Moyes at her astounding best. You’ll laugh, you’ll weep, and when you flip the last page, you’ll want to start all over again.

Jess is a resolutely optimistic single mother who struggles with two jobs and two kids after her husband, seemingly suffering from depression, leaves them to move back in with his mother. When her daughter Tanzie gets the opportunity of a lifetime at a prestigious school, the only way the tuition can get paid is if Jess gets her to a Math Olympiad in Scotland. The only problem is, they don’t have a car nor the funds to get there. Ed, a tech millionaire who’s house Jess cleans, has gotten into a world of trouble involving being accused of insider trading and he needs to get out of town in hopes that his troubles blow over. Ed ends up offering to drive Jess, her two kids and they’re stinky dog Norman to Scotland in what ends up being one seriously stressful yet hilarious road trip.

In this hysterical and emotional tale of opposites attract, Jojo Moyes continues to solidify her spot as one of my favorite authors. Her portrayal of life as a single mom struggling to keep her kids fed was sobering but terribly relatable if anyone has ever struggled financially. Jojo Moyes also tackles the topic of economic differences, bullies and deadbeat dads with ease. Her characterization is unerring with each and every character well-written and detailed without managing to tread too far into predictable territory. Her stories have always managed to throw me with their unexpected twists and One Plus One is no different. The two main characters both possess enough wittiness and differences which cause their attraction to not be immediate. The romance is a slow, subtle build that even though you’re expecting you still won’t really see it coming.

One Plus One’s summary would suggest a typical, formulaic chick-lit story of opposites attract but culminates into a simple and pleasing page-turner that fans of the genre won’t want to miss.

The Undomestic Goddess by Sophie Kinsella {Purchase}
Sweet Nothings by Janis Thomas {PurchaseReview}
Vanity Fare: A Novel of Lattes, Literature, and Love by Megan Caldwell {PurchaseReview}

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Book Review – Sixth Grave on the Edge (Charley Davidson #6) by Darynda Jones

Posted May 30, 2014 by Bonnie in Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2014 / 3 Comments

Book Review – Sixth Grave on the Edge (Charley Davidson #6) by Darynda JonesSixth Grave on the Edge by Darynda Jones
Series: Charley Davidson #6
Published by St. Martin's Press on May 20th 2014
Pages: 352
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Urban Fantasy
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: First Grave on the Right, For I Have Sinned, Second Grave on the Left

three-half-stars

Sometimes I wrestle my demons. Sometimes we just snuggle.
Bumper Sticker

Most girls might think twice before getting engaged to someone like Reyes Farrow—but Charley Davidson is not most girls. She’s a paranormal private eye and grim reaper-in-training who’s known to be a bit of a hell-raiser, especially after a few shots of caffeine. Her beloved Reyes may be the only begotten son of evil, but he’s dark and sultry and deeply sexy and everything Charley could hope for. Really. But when the FBI file on Reyes’ childhood happens to land into her lap, she can’t help herself: She opens it...and then the real fun begins. First, Charley finds a naked corpse riding shotgun in her car. Then, a man loses his soul in a card game. Throw in a Deaf boy who sees dead people, a woman running from mobsters, and a very suspicious Reyes, and things can’t get any worse for Charley. Unless, of course, the Twelve Beasts of Hell are unleashed…

Sixth Grave on the Edge is the sixth Charley Davidson novel from bestselling author Darynda Jones

Charley Davidson series

First Grave on the Right (Charley Davidson, #1) {PurchaseMy Review}
Second Grave on the Left (Charley Davidson, #2) {Purchase}
Third Grave Dead Ahead (Charley Davidson, #3) {Purchase}
For I Have Sinned (Charley Davidson, #3.5) {Free Online Read – My Review}
Fourth Grave Beneath My Feet (Charley Davidson #4) {PurchaseMy Review}
Fifth Grave Past the Light (Charley Davidson, #5) {PurchaseMy Review}

“Charley brings out the worst in all of us. It’s not her fault.”
“He’s right,” I said. “I have a condition.”

Charley’s back and busier than ever. She’s investigating a case of child abduction for the FBI and the child is none other than Reyes Farrow. She’s forced into finding a witness scheduled to testify after armed gunmen break into her home and threaten her. She’s helping a man get his soul back after he lost it in a poker game, trying to figure out why her dad is acting so mysterious and also dealing with her other full-time of being a grim reaper. Charley certainly has her hands full.

I can’t tell you how wonderful it feels having a new Charley Davidson book to read. I won’t likely ever be complaining that this series has gone on for far too long because Charley is such an entertaining and snarky character with some of the most hilariously witty lines I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading. She’s up to her same shenanigans, going outside of her way to help people to her own detriment, but this is the Charley we’ve all grown to know and love.

​”Imagine a canvas bathed completely in black. Only black. There is no shape. No purpose other than to bring darkness. Then splash on a brilliant white. Add some reds and blues, some yellows and greens. Suddenly it has meaning. It has a reason to exist. That is what you have to my world.”

Charley and Reyes is one of my favorite aspects of this series. <3 The steaminess continues and I love how well-developed and non-corny their romance is written. It’s authentic and genuine and you can feel the emotions that the two have for each other radiate off the page.

Such as how it was in Fifth Grave Past the Light, Sixth Grave manages to somehow end on an even bigger shocker of a cliffhanger. As much as I despise cliffhangers though, this one has much more to do with the main storyline and gives me hope that the books will begin focusing on that aspect more. Plus, we only have six short months until Seventh Grave and No Body is released so I suppose I can scrounge up some patience.

As much as I enjoyed this installment, because come on it’s Charley after all, it felt very filler-y. There wasn’t nearly as much progression in the ongoing grim-reaper storyline as I would have liked and there was not only too much time spent on the side mysteries but there were far too many of them that became a bit convoluted. There were also many questions introduced but not a lot of answers. Charley is forever a favorite of mine but Sixth Grave on the Edge felt unfortunately like the weakest installment yet.

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Audiobook Review – The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

Posted April 22, 2014 by Bonnie in Adult, Audiobooks, Book Reviews, Read in 2013 / 0 Comments

I received this book free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Audiobook Review – The Rosie Project by Graeme SimsionThe Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion
Published by Simon & Schuster Audio on October 1st 2013
Length: 7 hrs and 32 mins
Genres: Contemporary Romance, Funny-ha-ha
Format: Audiobook
Source: the Publisher
Amazon
Goodreads


two-stars

THE ART OF LOVE IS NEVER A SCIENCE

MEET DON TILLMAN, a brilliant yet socially challenged professor of genetics, who's decided it's time he found a wife. And so, in the orderly, evidence-based manner with which Don approaches all things, he designs the Wife Project to find his perfect partner: a sixteen-page, scientifically valid survey to filter out the drinkers, the smokers, the late arrivers.

Rosie Jarman is all these things. She also is strangely beguiling, fiery, and intelligent. And while Don quickly disqualifies her as a candidate for the Wife Project, as a DNA expert Don is particularly suited to help Rosie on her own quest: identifying her biological father. When an unlikely relationship develops as they collaborate on the Father Project, Don is forced to confront the spontaneous whirlwind that is Rosie—and the realization that, despite your best scientific efforts, you don’t find love, it finds you.

Arrestingly endearing and entirely unconventional, Graeme Simsion's distinctive debut will resonate with anyone who has ever tenaciously gone after life or love in the face of great challenges. The Rosie Project is a rare find: a book that restores our optimism in the power of human connection.

“If you really love someone […] you have to be prepared to accept them as they are. Maybe you hope that one day they get a wake-up call and make the changes for their own reasons.”

Don Tillman is a socially awkward and emotionally challenged individual that decides one day it is well past time he find himself a wife. Approaching this situation (as he does everything in his life) in an organized and scientific based manner, he develops a survey in hopes to weed out the most incompatible. Rosie Jarman is sarcastic and free-spirited and despite the fact that she was deemed incompatible by the survey, the duo form an unlikely relationship when they team up to find Rosie’s biological father.

Heyyyy. Check me and my 2-star rating out. I’m clearly the black sheep of the crowd because everyone seems to adore this book.

I’d like to attribute my lack of love for this book by the circumstances of the moment as I was feeling far too cynical but I’m not sure if that’s completely the case. There’s a soft squishy part of my heart that likes the idea of love conquering all but the rational part always overcomes. Especially with this story. Don doesn’t realize he has Asperger’s syndrome, but everyone else in his life does. He leads an uncompromising life full of schedules and deadlines, despises time wasting situations and has a terrible time handling physical contact of any sort (as if the fact that he’s trying to search out his future wife via a survey didn’t make that abundantly clear).

I am extremely socially inept and should have been able to relate to Dan. I think where they lost me is the author’s attempt to slap an unnecessary designation on his lack of social graces. Is the belief that he would not have been as funny or charming if there wasn’t a scientific justification behind his excessive awkwardness? His lack of social skills could have simply been a quirky part of his nature, but instead the fact that it was given a ‘reason’ it was in turn labeled as a ‘problem’. Yes, maybe I’m reading far too much into this but it just felt off. The ending made it all the more apparent. View Spoiler »

The story traveled a predictable path and lacked any interesting characteristics to set it apart from other contemporary romances, even with the slight unconventional aspect.

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Audiobook Review – Beauty Queens by Libba Bray

Posted April 10, 2014 by Bonnie in Audiobooks, Book Reviews, Read in 2014, YA / 4 Comments

Audiobook Review – Beauty Queens by Libba BrayBeauty Queens by Libba Bray
Narrator: Libba Bray
Published by Scholastic Audio on May 24, 2011
Length: 14 hours, 33 minutes
Genres: Contemporary, Funny-ha-ha
Format: Audiobook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


two-stars

From bestselling, Printz Award-winning author Libba Bray, a desert island classic.

Survival. Of the fittest.

The fifty contestants in the Miss Teen Dream Pageant thought this was going to be a fun trip to the beach, where they could parade in their state-appropriate costumes and compete in front of the cameras. But sadly, their airplane had another idea, crashing on a desert island and leaving the survivors stranded with little food, little water, and practically no eyeliner.

What's a beauty queen to do? Continue to practice for the talent portion of the program - or wrestle snakes to the ground? Get a perfect tan - or learn to run wild? And what should happen when the sexy pirates show up?

Welcome to the heart of non-exfoliated darkness. Your tour guide? None other than Libba Bray, the hilarious, sensational, Printz Award-winning author of A Great and Terrible Beauty and Going Bovine. The result is a novel that will make you laugh, make you think, and make you never see beauty the same way again.

I’m a huge Libba Bray fan and I remember being so excited to get my hands on this when it first released. Long story short, I don’t think I got past page 10 before I DNF’d. Hearing that the audiobook was way better I figured it deserved another shot. Libba Bray herself narrates this audiobook and manages to do a different voice for each and every one of the characters. The accents were gimmicky and nowhere near authentic but they were incredibly entertaining. The audio is over 14 hours long though and it unfortunately grew a bit tiresome and added to the overall ridiculousness of the whole thing after a while.

The big thing with Beauty Queens are the ‘messages’ which tackle the unrealistic standards that all girls face (not just pageant girls) but it did oftentimes feel overdone and exaggerated. Add to that, the messages were simply too obvious and came off as preachy more than anything. In addition there was the massive amount of satire this book was steeped in. While all together the story was rather admittedly a bit over the top and incredibly goofy at times, it did have some entertaining moments. At least until the boat full of testosterone reality TV show pirates showed up. They upped the level of ridiculous for me and officially lost me. And if I was barely avoiding another DNF before, the introduction of the evil corporation trying to kill the beauty queen contestants would have been the nail in the coffin if I wasn’t already close to being finished. There was a lot of sighing and a lot of eye-rolling. Maybe I just wasn’t in a super funny mood? No clue. I realize that this is meant to be a fun and entertaining book not meant to be taken seriously at all, but it was simply too excessive for my liking.

Beauty Queens is an eclectic combination of one of those cringe-worthy parody movies, a satirical Lord of the Flies and an Austin Powers movie. I agree with the message the book aimed to prove, but I like when messages are a bit more subtle and a little less hammer to the head.

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Audiobook Review – Let’s Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir) by Jenny Lawson

Posted February 13, 2014 by Bonnie in Adult, Audiobooks, Book Reviews, Read in 2014 / 9 Comments

Audiobook Review – Let’s Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir) by Jenny LawsonLet's Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir) by Jenny Lawson
Published by Penguin Audio on April 17th 2012
Length: 8 hours and 41 minutes
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Memoir, Non-Fiction
Format: Audiobook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads


five-stars

Internet star Jenny Lawson, aka The Bloggess, makes her literary debut, and narrates this audio version.

Jenny Lawson realized that the most mortifying moments of our lives - the ones we'd like to pretend never happened - are in fact the ones that define us. In Let's Pretend This Never Happened, Lawson takes readers on a hilarious journey recalling her bizarre upbringing in rural Texas, her devastatingly awkward high school years, and her relationship with her long-suffering husband, Victor.

Chapters include: "Stanley the Magical, Talking Squirrel", "A Series of Angry Post-It Notes to My Husband", "My Vagina Is Fine. Thanks for Asking", and "And Then I Snuck a Dead Cuban Alligator on an Airplane".

“I told my boss that I had a book inside of me, and that I needed to get it out even if I had to squeeze it through my vagina. Because that’s exactly what the world needs. A book squeezed from my vagina.”

Jenny Lawson, also known as The Bloggess, is an internet sensation that I only recently became aware of. I’m not quite sure how I survived in life without her hilarious stories to be quite honest. I guess it should be mentioned for those with delicate sensibilities that Jenny cusses a lot, but considering you’re visiting my blog I would expect you’re used to that from me by now.

This book is absolutely fucking hilarious but it’s that type of funny that is only funny when it doesn’t happen to you. Like when Jenny talks about that time she walks into a deer carcass. Or when her dad brought home a talking squirrel only to find it was actually a squirrel puppet and her dads hand was shoved up inside its dead body. Or when Jenny brought home her future in-laws to meet her folks and her dad was out back boiling animal skulls. Or when she practically overdosed on laxatives and a burglar was shoving notes to her from under the bathroom door except it ended up being her cat. (I literally almost fell off the treadmill at the gym laughing at that scene. People were looking at me with serious concern.) But seriously. What horrible things to have to live through. But since I didn’t they were some of the funniest fucking things I have ever heard.

“Oh my God, calm down, Darwin. Don’t get all crazy just ’cause I threw a vampire monkey wrench in your faulty Jesus-zombie logic.”

All of the back and forth verbal sparring between Jenny and Victor was the absolute freaking best but I could go on and on with my favorite scenes. So what the fuck, I will! Like when she asked the nurse if they could make her cesarean scar the shape of a lightning bolt so whenever she had menstrual cramps she could pretend Voldemort was close. Or when she purchased a giant metal chicken (named it Beyonce), put it in front of her front door, rang the doorbell and ran so that she could scare her husband. You cannot make up funnier shit.

“It’s an anniversary gift for you, asshole. Two whole weeks early. FIFTEEN YEARS IS BIG METAL CHICKENS.”

This is a book made for the sole purpose of enjoyment. Because you will laugh, I guaran-fucking-tee it. But the bottom line is this book only goes to show that those crazy moments in life are the character building moments that make us who we are, for better or worse, so you might as well embrace it.

If I’ve (hopefully) convinced any of you to read this, I’ll let you know right now that you absolutely MUST listen to the audio. You’re totally missing out if you don’t. The sound effects were the freaking best and I can’t imagine reading this book without them. There was the cocking shotguns, the crazy clucking chickens and Jenny’s singing introductions and an odd assortment of other sound effects that had me non-stop rolling with laughter. Whenever I finish an audiobook I immediately delete it from my phone and move right on to the next one. But this one stayed put because whenever I’m in need of a gut-busting laugh I’ll always have this on hand to get the job done.

“In short? It is exhausting being me. Pretending to be normal is draining and requires amazing amounts of energy and Xanax.”

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Waiting on Wednesday – Sixth Grave on the Edge (Charley Davidson #6) by Darynda Jones

Posted October 30, 2013 by Bonnie in Waiting on Wednesday / 5 Comments

Waiting on Wednesday – Sixth Grave on the Edge (Charley Davidson #6) by Darynda JonesSixth Grave on the Edge by Darynda Jones
Series: Charley Davidson #6
Published by St. Martin's Press on May 20th 2014
Pages: 352
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Romance, Urban Fantasy
Format: Hardcover
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: First Grave on the Right, For I Have Sinned, Second Grave on the Left

*Spoilers for those not caught up in the series!!!*

Few things in life can come between a grim reaper and her coffee, but the sexy, sultry son of Satan is one of them. Now that she's agreed to marry Reyes Farrow, Charley Davidson feels like it's about time she knows more about his past. With Reyes reluctant to open up, Charley decides to take matters into her own hands and investigates secretly when the official FBI file of his childhood abduction lands in her lap. Because what could go wrong with that?

Unfortunately, another case has fallen into her lap, too—one with dangerous implications. Some very determined men want to find a certain witness who is scheduled to testify against their boss, a major player in the local crime syndicate. If Charley doesn't come up with an address in 48 hours, the people closest to her will start to disappear.

On top of that, Uncle Bob has a bizarre case involving random incidents of knifing in Albuquerque's Old Town. He suspects supernatural forces are at play, but can't solve the case without Charley's expertise.

Good thing for Charley she's used to multi-tasking and always up for a challenge…especially when that challenge comes in the form of Reyes Farrow.

May?? That’s so incredibly far away! Sounds like we can expect Charley to be up to her same shenanigans though. I can’t wait!

What are you waiting on this Wednesday?

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Early Review – Simon’s Cat vs. the World (Simon’s Cat #4) by Simon Tofield

Posted September 13, 2013 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2013 / 0 Comments

I received this book free from Library Thing, the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Simon’s Cat vs. the World (Simon’s Cat #4) by Simon TofieldSimon's Cat vs. the World by Simon Tofield
Series: Simon's Cat #4
Published by Akashic Books on October 1st 2013
Pages: 96
Genres: Funny-ha-ha
Format: ARC
Source: Library Thing, the Publisher
Amazon
Goodreads


four-stars

Simon's Cat proved his authority in the house. He returned victorious from his adventures beyond the garden fence. He prevailed after the chaotic arrival of a new kitten. Now he takes on the world! Illustrated in glorious full color, this volume explodes from the page with mesmerizing levels of detail. Simon's Cat films have over 280 million YouTube views!

Simon Tofield is an award-winning illustrator, animator, and director at Tandem Films in London. At the age of nine, Simon received his first kitten, a stray rescued from a farmer's barn. He has had cats ever since. When not attending to his cats' needs, Simon likes painting, reading history books, and spending time in the great British countryside. His Simon's Cat short films have garnered hundreds of millions of views, and the book versions have been international bestsellers.

Simon’s Cat began as a series of YouTube videos and quickly turned popular for their hilariousness and how accurate the depictions were of how cat’s truly are. The first Simon’s Cat video was uploaded over 5 years ago, on March 4, 2008. It’s one of my all-time favorites.

While the books aren’t nearly as hilarious as the videos, they are still entertaining and fun to flip through for a good laugh. Simon’s Cat vs. the World are single page illustions detailing various encounters from visits to the Vet, holiday outifts, discovering the vividness of HD TV and even fireworks.


In addition to that, there was also a short section in the back that details how to draw a few of the animals that feature in his books.

And my favorite part? A whole page of adorable stickers.

The best thing about these books is just how realistically the illustrations showcase the shenanigans of cats and what cat owner’s constantly have to deal with. Simon’s Cat is highly amusing and a source of good quick fun. Recommended for any cat lover and anyone who just enjoys a good laugh.

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Book Review – The Tao of Martha by Jen Lancaster

Posted July 23, 2013 by Bonnie in Adult, Book Reviews, Read in 2013 / 0 Comments

Book Review – The Tao of Martha by Jen LancasterThe Tao of Martha: My Year of LIVING; Or, Why I'm Never Getting All That Glitter Off of the Dog by Jen Lancaster
Published by NAL on June 4th 2013
Pages: 335
Genres: Funny-ha-ha, Memoir, Non-Fiction
Format: eBook
Source: Library
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: Here I Go Again

two-half-stars

One would think that with Jen Lancaster’s impressive list of bestselling self-improvement memoirs—Bitter Is the New Black; Bright Lights, Big Ass; Such a Pretty Fat; Pretty in Plaid; My Fair Lazy; and Jeneration X—that she would have it all together by now.

One would be wrong.

Jen’s still a little rough around the edges. Suffice it to say, she’s no Martha Stewart. And that is exactly why Jen is going to Martha up and live her life according to the advice of America’s overachieving older sister—the woman who turns lemons into lavender-infused lemonade.

By immersing herself in Martha’s media empire, Jen will embark on a yearlong quest to take herself, her house, her husband (and maybe even her pets) to the next level—from closet organization to craft making, from party planning to kitchen prep.

Maybe Jen can go four days without giving herself food poisoning if she follows Martha’s dictates on proper storage....Maybe she can grow closer to her girlfriends by taking up their boring-ass hobbies like knitting and sewing.…Maybe she can finally rid her workout clothes of meatball stains by using Martha’s laundry tips.… Maybe she can create a more meaningful anniversary celebration than just getting drunk in the pool with her husband....again. And maybe, just maybe, she’ll discover that the key to happiness does, in fact, lie in Martha’s perfectly arranged cupboards and artfully displayed charcuterie platters.

‘…ready or not, happiness, here I come.’

Organization = happiness? That’s what Jen Lancaster has set out to prove. Her life is in dire need of some organization not just within her house but in her life in general and she thinks that in doing so she’ll be less stressful and have more happiness. She decides to emulate the Queen of Organization: Martha Stewart. The Tao of Martha is her personal accounting of incorporating Martha’s ideals into her daily life, both when it goes right and when it goes horribly wrong.

Having read all of Jen’s memoirs, it’s become a requirement to pick any new ones up even if they have steadily declined over the years. I’m thinking it’s a combination of lack of new material that’s actually worth writing about and a dramatic change in lifestyle from what we originally saw in her first memoir ‘Bitter is the New Black’. In ‘Bitter’, Jen is a much more relatable person as she’s struggling to survive as her and her husband both are unemployed. With each memoir she is slowly transforming into the person who talks only of her cleaning ladies, monumentally expensive landscaping plans and her shopping excursions to affluent stores that I couldn’t even afford to breathe the air of. While the writing still manages to sustain (somewhat) the snark that we’ve all come to know and love, the stories have become achingly superficial. Prime example:

‘Shoot, I haven’t even reserved an organic turkey yet! (“I’ll take ‘The Most OverPrivileged First-World Complain to Ever Be Uttered’ for a hundred, Alec!”)’

Admitting that you’re being shallow still doesn’t make it funny.

While there were a few laugh out loud moments, I found the majority of ‘Tao’ to be incredibly boring. Early in the beginning there’s a 7+ page accounting of her cleaning her desk which includes an itemized description of everything she had stored from over the years. (Considering she just moved/bought her house a few years ago, all this excessive garbage she dragged to the new house makes it even less funny. Like the broken wine glass shards. Really?) One thing I’ve always loved about her memoirs is how each chapter is a story in and of itself but in ‘Tao’, again, wondering if she was just running out of material, there were several stories that lacked any sort of point and entertainment value (and a few stories that were entirely way too personal and included info I would rather just not know). Like the chapter where we receive entirely way too much info regarding her digestive system. Or the chapter where she discusses her massive love for zucchini for several pages. Or the bit how she’s attempting to figure out why her roses are dying when her friend points out that she probably shouldn’t be watering them with a high pressure hose (duh?)

While the funnies were lacking in consistency, this was still a fun and easy read that also managed to teach me a few things:
-15 pounds of Easter candy for 9 kids = bad math.
-When gardening make sure you don’t wear your older underwear so ticks can’t crawl up and attach themselves to your lady-parts.
-If I start stocking up on emergency rations, six jars of marshmallow fluff is not essential.
-If my doctor ever prescribes me Ambien, I’m chaining myself to the bed.

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Early Review – Sorry I Barfed on Your Bed: (and Other Heartwarming Letters from Kitty) by Jeremy Greenberg

Posted February 22, 2013 by Bonnie in Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2013 / 0 Comments

I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Sorry I Barfed on Your Bed: (and Other Heartwarming Letters from Kitty) by Jeremy GreenbergSorry I Barfed on Your Bed (and Other Heartwarming Letters from Kitty) by Jeremy Greenberg
Published by Andrews McMeel Publishing on April 2nd 2013
Pages: 64
Genres: Funny-ha-ha
Format: eARC
Source: Netgalley
Amazon
Goodreads


three-stars

The cat's answer to Sorry I Pooped in Your Shoe, Sorry I Barfed on Your Bed is a hilarious collection of full-color photos and letters of excuses and suggestions from cats to the people who love them—no matter what bad thing they’ve done!Inside Sorry I Barfed on Your Bed, writer and comedian Jeremy Greenberg presents a collection of laugh-out-loud letters and photographs that offer a cat's eye view on common feline vs. human cohabitation conundrums. It's the perfect gift for crazy cat lovers and anyone who appreciates hilarious (and so true!) insights into cat—and human—nature, including:

Your cat sits on your laptop not just for warmth or attention, but to prevent you from interacting with the outside world. After all, isn’t the main reason to have a cat so you don’t have to waste time developing normal human relationships? If you spent a third of your life licking yourself, you too would occasionally forget to stick your tongue back in your face. Eating grass has medicinal purposes, and most cats believe grass should be legalized. The cat feels bad about barfing on your bed…because now it must get to up to go sleep on your clean laundry instead.

Oh, cat books. As hard as I try and stay away from your infinite silliness, it’s forever a losing battle. Like air boxing.

But their cuteness cannot be denied. Admit it. Cats can be crazy cute.

But… of course they have their moments. Moments where one can only stare in horror and wonder what monster you brought home to live with you.

They’re basically just a furry paper weight that lacks any true purpose.

But what would do you think your cat would say to you if it could speak? Or if it could even write you a letter? Well, this book is the answer to all your questions! Why they need 12+ hours of sleep, why they have such a strange love for grass, and it even discusses their dislike for our perfume. Yes, all the questions we’ve always wanted to ask are now answered. Cute kitty letters with even cuter kitty pictures… what more could you ask for.

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Early Review – Here I Go Again by Jen Lancaster

Posted January 3, 2013 by Bonnie in Adult, Book Reviews, Early Review, Read in 2012 / 4 Comments

I received this book free from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Early Review – Here I Go Again by Jen LancasterHere I Go Again by Jen Lancaster
Published by NAL on January 29th 2013
Pages: 320
Genres: Chick-Lit, Contemporary, Funny-ha-ha
Format: eARC
Source: Edelweiss
Amazon
Goodreads

Also by this author: The Tao of Martha: My Year of LIVING; Or, Why I'm Never Getting All That Glitter Off of the Dog

four-stars

Hilarious new fiction from the New York Times bestselling author of Bitter Is the New Black and If You Were Here .

Twenty years after ruling the halls of her suburban Chicago high school, Lissy Ryder doesn't understand why her glory days ended. Back then, she was worshipped...beloved...feared. Present day, not so much. She's been pink-slipped from her high-paying job, dumped by her husband, and kicked out of her condo. Now, at thirty-seven, she's struggling to start a business out of her parents' garage and sleeping under the hair-band posters in her old bedroom.

Lissy finally realizes karma is the only bitch bigger than she was. Her present is miserable because of her past. But it's not like she can go back in time and change who she was...or can she?

Lissy Ryder is that kind of girl in school that is super popular and you can’t help but love/hate her. I know we all went to school with at least one Lissy-type. Her 20-year high school reunion is coming up and shortly before, everything about her life seems to falling apart at the seams. She’s kicked out of her swanky gym for not paying the fees, she gets fired from her job and her husband just asked her for a divorce.

Choosing not to wallow and instead pick herself up and go to her reunion she discovers that the people from high school don’t love her as much as they used. Actually? They pretty much hate everything about her. But what can she do? It’s not like she can change the past or anything… right?

I can’t help but love Jen Lancaster. I’ve followed her on Twitter and on her blog for years, I’ve read all of her memoirs, and she’s one seriously hilarious lady. But in ‘Here I Go Again’ I felt that her sense of humor really shined through in a whole new refreshing kind of way.

I loved pretty much everything about the book. 80’s references were strewn throughout (mainly regarding the big hair bands) and being a personal lover of the 80’s (and big hair bands) this was incredibly fun. I loved the cast of characters that were so completely hilarious, although Deva and her quirkiness was my favorite. But what made this most enjoyable was the fact that Lissy’s ‘change’ into a better person after realizing how wrong she was in the past was truly genuine. The time travel bit was goofy but completely intentional. Did it make a whole lot of sense? No. Was it supposed to? No. But was it entertaining? Absolutely.

Jen managed to write an extremely multi-layered story that was hilarious and incredibly enjoyable. Normally with these stories there’s always the picture perfect happy ending, but in ‘Here I Go Again’, well, as Lissy would say:

‘Karma really is a bitch.’

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